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Preputial damage and lateral penile displacement during castration in a degu

Michelle Y. Powers DVM1, Bonnie G. Campbell DVM, PhD, DACVS2, and Nickol P. Finch DVM3
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

Abstract

Case Description—A 2-month-old male degu was treated for preputial damage and lateral penile displacement that occurred during attempted castration.

Clinical Findings—Bruising and swelling of the prepuce and severe edema to the left of the prepuce were evident. The penis could not be extruded from the prepuce. Radiography revealed a large bladder. Contrast medium injected into the prepuce filled the peripreputial subcutaneous tissues.

Treatment and Outcome—During surgical exploration through a peripreputial approach, the penis was found to be completely separated from the prepuce and located in the adjacent subcutaneous tissue. The penis was repositioned in the prepuce and anchored with a suture at its base. The following day, the preputial orifice was crusted over, urine was leaking from the incision, and the penis could not be extruded from the prepuce. The anchoring suture was removed, and the tip of the penis was sutured to the preputial orifice so that the penis protruded slightly from the prepuce. Urination was normal after the second surgery. Two years later, the preputial orifice remained adhered to the distal portion of the penis and the exposed penile tissue was healthy.

Clinical Relevance—Penile displacement from the prepuce is an unusual complication of castration in degus. The surgical technique used in this animal may be an effective means of repair. Permanent exposure of the tip of the penis may be well-tolerated in degus.

Abstract

Case Description—A 2-month-old male degu was treated for preputial damage and lateral penile displacement that occurred during attempted castration.

Clinical Findings—Bruising and swelling of the prepuce and severe edema to the left of the prepuce were evident. The penis could not be extruded from the prepuce. Radiography revealed a large bladder. Contrast medium injected into the prepuce filled the peripreputial subcutaneous tissues.

Treatment and Outcome—During surgical exploration through a peripreputial approach, the penis was found to be completely separated from the prepuce and located in the adjacent subcutaneous tissue. The penis was repositioned in the prepuce and anchored with a suture at its base. The following day, the preputial orifice was crusted over, urine was leaking from the incision, and the penis could not be extruded from the prepuce. The anchoring suture was removed, and the tip of the penis was sutured to the preputial orifice so that the penis protruded slightly from the prepuce. Urination was normal after the second surgery. Two years later, the preputial orifice remained adhered to the distal portion of the penis and the exposed penile tissue was healthy.

Clinical Relevance—Penile displacement from the prepuce is an unusual complication of castration in degus. The surgical technique used in this animal may be an effective means of repair. Permanent exposure of the tip of the penis may be well-tolerated in degus.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Campbell.