Serum antibodies against human albumin in critically ill and healthy dogs

Linda G. Martin Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610

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 DVM, MS, DACVECC
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Teresa Y. Luther Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610

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 MBA
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Debra C. Alperin Departments of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610

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John M. Gay Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610

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Stephen A. Hines Departments of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610

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 DVM, PhD, DACVP

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Abstract

Objective—To characterize the magnitude and duration of the antibody response against human albumin (HA) in critically ill and healthy dogs.

Design—Cohort and cross-sectional study.

Animals—Fourteen critically ill dogs that received 25% HA as part of their treatment protocol, 2 healthy dogs with no known previous exposure to HA that received 2 infusions of 25% HA (positive control dogs), and 47 healthy dogs and 21 critically ill dogs with no known exposure to HA (negative control dogs).

Procedures—An ELISA to detect IgG against HA was developed. Serum samples were obtained from the critically ill dogs prior to infusion of HA, at the time of hospital discharge, and 4 to 6 weeks and 6 months after HA administration. Serum samples were obtained at 2- to 4-week intervals from both positive control dogs for 101 weeks. A single serum sample was obtained from each of the negative control dogs.

Results—All 14 critically ill dogs developed serum IgG against HA. Peak antibody response was detected 4 to 6 weeks after HA administration. In both positive control dogs, IgG against HA was detected 10 days after HA administration and continued past 97 weeks. The peak antibody response was detected at 3 weeks in 1 dog and at 9 weeks in the other. Five of the 68 (7%) negative control dogs had a positive antibody response.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that dogs developed a pronounced IgG response following exposure to HA and that some dogs with no history of HA administration were positive for anti-HA IgG.

Abstract

Objective—To characterize the magnitude and duration of the antibody response against human albumin (HA) in critically ill and healthy dogs.

Design—Cohort and cross-sectional study.

Animals—Fourteen critically ill dogs that received 25% HA as part of their treatment protocol, 2 healthy dogs with no known previous exposure to HA that received 2 infusions of 25% HA (positive control dogs), and 47 healthy dogs and 21 critically ill dogs with no known exposure to HA (negative control dogs).

Procedures—An ELISA to detect IgG against HA was developed. Serum samples were obtained from the critically ill dogs prior to infusion of HA, at the time of hospital discharge, and 4 to 6 weeks and 6 months after HA administration. Serum samples were obtained at 2- to 4-week intervals from both positive control dogs for 101 weeks. A single serum sample was obtained from each of the negative control dogs.

Results—All 14 critically ill dogs developed serum IgG against HA. Peak antibody response was detected 4 to 6 weeks after HA administration. In both positive control dogs, IgG against HA was detected 10 days after HA administration and continued past 97 weeks. The peak antibody response was detected at 3 weeks in 1 dog and at 9 weeks in the other. Five of the 68 (7%) negative control dogs had a positive antibody response.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that dogs developed a pronounced IgG response following exposure to HA and that some dogs with no history of HA administration were positive for anti-HA IgG.

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