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Association of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging findings with surgical features in Dachshunds with thoracolumbar intervertebral disk extrusion

Stephanus H. Naudé MMedVet1, Nicolaas E. Lambrechts MMedVet2, Wencke M. Wagner MMedVet3, and Peter N. Thompson MMedVet, PhD4
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  • 1 Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa, 0110.
  • | 2 Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa, 0110.
  • | 3 Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa, 0110.
  • | 4 Department of Production Animal Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa, 0110.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the accuracy of specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences in determining the site, lateralization, and extent of extruded intervertebral disk material (EIDM), compared with surgical findings, in Dachshunds with thoracolumbar intervertebral disk extrusion (TLIDE).

Design—Prospective clinical study.

Sample Population—16 Dachshunds with clinical signs of intervertebral disk disease.

Procedures—Preoperative T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) MRI measurements and description of the location of EIDM were compared with intraoperative measurements and determination of the EIDM position.

Results—The T12-13 intervertebral disk space was the most frequent site of EIDM (6/16 dogs). The EIDM lateralized with equal frequency to the left and right sides; no central extrusions were seen. There was moderate to substantial agreement (kappa, 0.59) between MRI and surgical findings for evaluation of the craniocaudal distribution of the EIDM. For measurement of the length of EIDM, the T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and STIR sequences had a mean error of −1.15, −0.38, and −1.93 mm, respectively; concordance correlation coefficients were 0.666, 0.904, and 0.458, respectively. Mean absolute errors were 2.54, 1.35, and 2.90 mm, respectively; these values did not differ significantly.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In the thoracolumbar vertebral column of Dachshunds with clinical signs of intervertebral disk disease, MRI is a valuable technique for determining location and craniocaudal length of EIDM. Compared with T1-weighted and STIR images, T2-weighted images appeared to be more accurate and precise and are potentially more reliable for determination of the length of EIDM in those dogs.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Naudé's present address is PO Box 1311, Randpark Ridge, South Africa, 2156.

Supported by the University of Pretoria Veterinary Faculty Research fund and the Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies Research fund.

Address correspondence to Dr. Naudé.