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Cardiac output and other hemodynamic variables in anesthetized dogs undergoing laparotomy because of abdominal neoplasia

Ann E. Wagner DVM, MS, DACVP, DACVA1 and Yukari Miyake BVSc, MS2
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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Abstract

Objective—To measure cardiac output and other hemodynamic variables in anesthetized dogs undergoing laparotomy because of abdominal neoplasia.

Design—Prospective case series.

Animals—8 dogs with splenic or hepatic tumors.

Procedures—Dogs were anesthetized and underwent abdominal laparotomy. End-tidal isoflurane concentration, heart rate, arterial blood pressures, cardiac output, arterial pH, blood gas partial pressures, PCV, and plasma total protein concentration were measured at set intervals before, during, and after surgery. Cardiac index, stroke index, and systemic vascular resistance index were calculated.

Results—End-tidal isoflurane concentration was lowest before and after surgery. Heart rate did not change significantly throughout the anesthetic period. Arterial blood pressures and systemic vascular resistance index were highest shortly after surgery began; cardiac index and stroke volume index did not change significantly during surgery but increased significantly after surgery ended.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that in dogs undergoing laparotomy because of abdominal neoplasia, changes in arterial blood pressures were not necessarily indicative of qualitatively similar changes in cardiac index.

Abstract

Objective—To measure cardiac output and other hemodynamic variables in anesthetized dogs undergoing laparotomy because of abdominal neoplasia.

Design—Prospective case series.

Animals—8 dogs with splenic or hepatic tumors.

Procedures—Dogs were anesthetized and underwent abdominal laparotomy. End-tidal isoflurane concentration, heart rate, arterial blood pressures, cardiac output, arterial pH, blood gas partial pressures, PCV, and plasma total protein concentration were measured at set intervals before, during, and after surgery. Cardiac index, stroke index, and systemic vascular resistance index were calculated.

Results—End-tidal isoflurane concentration was lowest before and after surgery. Heart rate did not change significantly throughout the anesthetic period. Arterial blood pressures and systemic vascular resistance index were highest shortly after surgery began; cardiac index and stroke volume index did not change significantly during surgery but increased significantly after surgery ended.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that in dogs undergoing laparotomy because of abdominal neoplasia, changes in arterial blood pressures were not necessarily indicative of qualitatively similar changes in cardiac index.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Miyake's present address is Room 307, 282 Victoria Ave, Chatswood, NSW 2067, Australia.

Presented as an abstract at the 31st Annual Meeting of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists, Chicago, October 2006.

Supported by a grant from the College Research Council, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University.

The authors thank Dr. James zumBrunnen of the Colorado State University Statistics Laboratory for statistical consultation and analyses.

Address correspondence to Dr. Wagner.