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Laparoscopic-assisted implantation of a urinary catheter in male sheep

Sonja FranzClinic for Ruminants, Department for Farm Animals and Veterinary Public Health, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, A-1210 Vienna, Austria.

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Agnes M. DadakInstitute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Department of Basic Sciences, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, A-1210 Vienna, Austria.

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Gudrun SchöffmannClinic for Anesthesiology and Perioperative Intensive Care, Department of Small Animals and Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, A-1210 Vienna, Austria.

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Paul CoppensClinic for Anesthesiology and Perioperative Intensive Care, Department of Small Animals and Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, A-1210 Vienna, Austria.

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Johannes L. KholClinic for Ruminants, Department for Farm Animals and Veterinary Public Health, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, A-1210 Vienna, Austria.

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Walter BaumgartnerClinic for Ruminants, Department for Farm Animals and Veterinary Public Health, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, A-1210 Vienna, Austria.

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Gilles DupreClinic for Surgery, Department of Small Animals and Horses, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, A-1210 Vienna, Austria.

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate a laparoscopic technique for implantation of a urinary catheter in the right paramedian area in male sheep and to determine feasibility, benefits, and risks for this technique.

Design—Evaluation study.

Animals—6 healthy male sheep (mean ± SD body weight, 42.16 ± 11.95 kg [92.75 ± 26.29 lb]).

Procedures—Each sheep was anesthetized and positioned in dorsal recumbency. A 10-mm laparoscope was inserted in the right paramedian area between the xiphoid and preputial orifice. After creation of capnoperitoneum, grasping forceps were inserted in the left paramedian area at the level of the teats and used to immobilize the urinary bladder. A pigtail balloon catheter was implanted transcutaneously in the right paramedian area between the preputial orifice and teats and directed into the urinary bladder by use of laparoscopic guidance. The catheter was removed 10 days after implantation. Fourteen days after initial surgery, a second laparoscopy was performed to evaluate pathologic changes.

Results—Inadvertent insertion of the first trocar into the rumen of 1 sheep was the only intraoperative complication encountered. Laparoscopic-assisted implantation of the urinary catheter was successfully performed in all sheep. No postoperative complications were detected.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Laparoscopic-assisted implantation of a urinary catheter in the right paramedian area was successfully performed and may be a feasible method for use in sheep. This method can be considered as an alternative to tube cystotomy performed by laparotomy.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate a laparoscopic technique for implantation of a urinary catheter in the right paramedian area in male sheep and to determine feasibility, benefits, and risks for this technique.

Design—Evaluation study.

Animals—6 healthy male sheep (mean ± SD body weight, 42.16 ± 11.95 kg [92.75 ± 26.29 lb]).

Procedures—Each sheep was anesthetized and positioned in dorsal recumbency. A 10-mm laparoscope was inserted in the right paramedian area between the xiphoid and preputial orifice. After creation of capnoperitoneum, grasping forceps were inserted in the left paramedian area at the level of the teats and used to immobilize the urinary bladder. A pigtail balloon catheter was implanted transcutaneously in the right paramedian area between the preputial orifice and teats and directed into the urinary bladder by use of laparoscopic guidance. The catheter was removed 10 days after implantation. Fourteen days after initial surgery, a second laparoscopy was performed to evaluate pathologic changes.

Results—Inadvertent insertion of the first trocar into the rumen of 1 sheep was the only intraoperative complication encountered. Laparoscopic-assisted implantation of the urinary catheter was successfully performed in all sheep. No postoperative complications were detected.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Laparoscopic-assisted implantation of a urinary catheter in the right paramedian area was successfully performed and may be a feasible method for use in sheep. This method can be considered as an alternative to tube cystotomy performed by laparotomy.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Schöffmann's present address is Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, The University of Edinburgh, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, Scotland.

Supported by the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna (start-up project—Profillinie 1).

The authors thank Dr. Christian Gelfert for assistance with the statistical analysis.

Address correspondence to Dr. Franz.