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Use of laser lithotripsy for fragmentation of uroliths in dogs: 73 cases (2005–2006)

Larry G. AdamsDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2026

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Allyson C. BerentDepartment of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010

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George E. MooreDepartment of Comparative Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2026

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Demetrius H. BagleyDepartment of Urology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107

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Abstract

Objective—To describe use of transurethral cystoscope–guided laser lithotripsy for fragmentation of cystic and urethral uroliths and determine procedure duration and short-term and long-term outcome in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—73 dogs with naturally occurring uroliths in the urinary bladder, urethra, or both.

Procedures—Transurethral cystoscope–guided laser lithotripsy was performed in all dogs, and medical records were reviewed for short-term and long-term outcome and complications.

Results—Laser lithotripsy resulted in complete fragmentation of all uroliths in all 28 female dogs and a majority of male dogs (39/45 [86.7%]). Dogs with urethroliths had shorter median laser time than dogs with cystic uroliths. Basket extraction and voiding urohydro-propulsion were successful for removal of the urolith fragments following laser lithotripsy. Complications related to cystoscope-guided laser lithotripsy occurred in 5 of 28 (17.9%) female dogs and 6 of 45 (13.3%) male dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Transurethral cystoscope–guided laser lithotripsy was successful in female dogs and most male dogs for fragmentation of cystic and urethral uroliths. Short-term complications were most commonly related to urethral swelling and resolved with placement of an indwelling urinary catheter. There were no long-term complications.

Abstract

Objective—To describe use of transurethral cystoscope–guided laser lithotripsy for fragmentation of cystic and urethral uroliths and determine procedure duration and short-term and long-term outcome in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—73 dogs with naturally occurring uroliths in the urinary bladder, urethra, or both.

Procedures—Transurethral cystoscope–guided laser lithotripsy was performed in all dogs, and medical records were reviewed for short-term and long-term outcome and complications.

Results—Laser lithotripsy resulted in complete fragmentation of all uroliths in all 28 female dogs and a majority of male dogs (39/45 [86.7%]). Dogs with urethroliths had shorter median laser time than dogs with cystic uroliths. Basket extraction and voiding urohydro-propulsion were successful for removal of the urolith fragments following laser lithotripsy. Complications related to cystoscope-guided laser lithotripsy occurred in 5 of 28 (17.9%) female dogs and 6 of 45 (13.3%) male dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Transurethral cystoscope–guided laser lithotripsy was successful in female dogs and most male dogs for fragmentation of cystic and urethral uroliths. Short-term complications were most commonly related to urethral swelling and resolved with placement of an indwelling urinary catheter. There were no long-term complications.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Adams.