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Evaluation of a point-of-care hematology analyzer for use in dogs and cats receiving chemotherapeutic treatment

Ana Lara-Garcia DVM, PhD, DACVIM1, Kenji Hosoya DVM, MSc, DACVR2, Cristina Iazbik DVM3, Nicole Westendorf4, Stacey Gallant5, and Guillermo Couto DVM, DACVIM6
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 6 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

Abstract

Objective—To compare WBC, neutrophil, and platelet counts and Hct values obtained with a point-of-care hematology analyzer with values obtained by a reference method for dogs and cats receiving chemotherapy.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Animals—105 dogs and 25 cats undergoing chemotherapy.

Procedures—Blood samples were analyzed with a point-of-care hematology analyzer and with an impedance- and laser-based analyzer with manual differential WBC counts. Results for WBC, neutrophil, and platelet counts and Hct were compared. Sensitivity and specificity of the point-of-care analyzer to detect leukopenia, neutropenia, and anemia were calculated.

Results—554 canine and 96 feline blood samples were evaluated. Correlation coefficients for dogs and cats, respectively, were 0.92 and 0.95 for total WBC count, 0.91 and 0.88 for neutrophil count, 0.95 and 0.92 for Hct, and 0.93 and 0.71 for platelet count. Sensitivity and specificity, respectively, of the point-of-care analyzer to detect leukopenia were 100% and 75% for dogs and 100% and 68% for cats; to detect neutropenia were 80% and 97% for dogs and 100% and 80% for cats; to detect anemia were 100% and 80% for dogs and 100% and 66% for cats; and to detect thrombocytopenia were 86% and 95% for dogs and 50% and 87% for cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The point-of-care analyzer was reliable for monitoring CBCs of dogs and cats receiving chemotherapy. It had good to excellent correlation for WBC and neutrophil counts and Hct and accurately detected leukopenia, neutropenia, and anemia. Sensitivity of the analyzer for detecting thrombocytopenia was lower but acceptable.

Contributor Notes

Presented in part at the 25th Annual Conference of the Veterinary Cancer Society, Huntington Beach, Calif, October 2005.

The authors thank James Russell for technical assistance

Address correspondence to Dr. Lara-Garcia.