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Compendium of Animal Rabies Prevention and Control, 2008

Ben Sun DVM, MPVM, Chair1, Michael Auslander DVM, MSPH2, Catherine M. Brown DVM, MSc, MPH3, Lisa Conti DVM, MPH4, Paul Ettestad DVM, MS5, Mira J. Leslie DVM, MPH6, and Faye E. Sorhage VMD, MPH7
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  • 1 The National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians Committee
  • | 2 The National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians Committee
  • | 3 The National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians Committee
  • | 4 The National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians Committee
  • | 5 The National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians Committee
  • | 6 The National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians Committee
  • | 7 The National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians Committee

Rabies is a fatal viral zoonosis and a serious public health problem.1 The disease is an acute progressive encephalitis caused by a Lyssavirus. Although the United States has been declared free of canine rabies virus variant transmission, multiple viral variants are maintained in wild mammal populations, and there is always a risk of reintroduction of canine rabies.2 All mammals are believed to be susceptible to the disease, and for purposes of this document, use of the term animal refers to mammals. The recommendations in this compendium serve as a basis for animal rabies-prevention and

Contributor Notes

Consultants to the Committee—Keith Friendshuh, DVM (AVMA); Donna M. Gatewood, DVM, MS (USDA Center for Veterinary Biologics); Suzanne R. Jenkins, VMD, MPH; Lorraine Moule (National Animal Control Association [NACA]); Barbara Nay (Animal Health Institute); Raoult Ratard, MD, MS, MPH (Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists [CSTE]); Charles E. Rupprecht, VMD, MS, PhD (CDC); Dennis Slate, PhD (USDA Wildlife Services); Charles V. Trimarchi, MS (Association of Public Health Laboratories [APHL]); Burton Wilcke Jr, PhD (American Public Health Association [APHA]).

Endorsed by the APHA, AVMA, APHL, CSTE, NACA, and CDC.

Address correspondence to Ben Sun, DVM, MPVM, State Public Health Veterinarian, California Department of Public Health, Veterinary Public Health Section, MS 7308, PO Box 997377, Sacramento, CA 95899-7377.