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Comparison of efficacy and safety of paste formulations of firocoxib and phenylbutazone in horses with naturally occurring osteoarthritis

Michèle Y. Doucet DVM, DVSc, DACVIM, DACVCP1, Alicia L. Bertone DVM, PhD, DACVS2, Dean Hendrickson DVM, MS, DACVS3, Faith Hughes DVM, DACVS4, Charles MacAllister DVM, DACVIM5, Scott McClure DVM, PhD, DACVS6, Craig Reinemeyer DVM, PhD7, Yves Rossier DVM, DACVIM8, Roger Sifferman DVM9, André A. Vrins DVM10, Gary White DVM11, Bruce Kunkle DVM, PhD12, Roberto Alva DVM, PhD13, Davida Romano MPH14, and Peter D. Hanson DVM, PhD, DACVS15
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  • 1 Département de Biomédecine Vétérinaire, Faculté de Médecine Vétérinaire, Université de Montreal, Montreal, QC J2S 7C6, Canada.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1089.
  • | 3 Veterinary Teaching Hospital, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
  • | 4 Peterson & Smith Equine Hospital, 4747 SW 60th Ave, Ocala, FL34474.
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.
  • | 6 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010-1250.
  • | 7 East Tennessee Clinical Research Inc, 80 Copper Ridge Farm Rd, Rockwood, TN 37854.
  • | 8 Département de Biomédecine Vétérinaire, Faculté de Médecine Vétérinaire, Université de Montreal, Montreal, QC J2S 7C6, Canada.
  • | 9 Bradford Park Veterinary Hospital, 255 E Independence, Springfield, MO 65804.
  • | 10 Département de Biomédecine Vétérinaire, Faculté de Médecine Vétérinaire, Université de Montreal, Montreal, QC J2S 7C6, Canada.
  • | 11 Sallisaw Equine Clinic, 213 Mockingbird Ln S, Sallisaw, OK 74955.
  • | 12 Merial Ltd, 3239 Satellite Blvd, Duluth, GA 30096.
  • | 13 Merial Ltd, 3239 Satellite Blvd, Duluth, GA 30096.
  • | 14 Merial Ltd, 3239 Satellite Blvd, Duluth, GA 30096.
  • | 15 Merial Ltd, 3239 Satellite Blvd, Duluth, GA 30096.

Abstract

Objective—To compare efficacy and safety of paste formulations of firocoxib and phenylbutazone in horses with naturally occurring osteoarthritis.

Design—Randomized controlled clinical trial.

Animals—253 client-owned horses with naturally occurring osteoarthritis.

Procedures—Horses were treated with firocoxib (0.1 mg/kg [0.045 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h) or phenylbutazone (4.4 mg/kg [2 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h) for 14 days. Physical examinations and lameness evaluations were performed prior to treatment and after 7 and 14 days. Clinical improvement was defined as a reduction of at least 1 lameness grade or a combined reduction of at least 3 points in scores for pain during manipulation or palpation, joint swelling, joint circumference, and range of motion.

Results—Proportion of horses clinically improved on day 14 for the firocoxib group (104/123 [84.6%]) was not significantly different from the proportion for the phenylbutazone group (103/119 [86.6%]). Proportion of horses that were improved on day 14 was significantly greater for horses treated with firocoxib than for horses treated with phenylbutazone with regard to score for pain on manipulation or palpation (P = 0.028), joint circumference score (P = 0.026), and range of motion score (P = 0.012), but not for overall lameness score or joint swelling score. No direct treatment-related adverse effects were detected during the study.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that overall clinical efficacy of a paste formulation of firocoxib in horses with naturally occurring osteoarthritis was comparable to efficacy of a paste formulation of phenylbutazone.

Abstract

Objective—To compare efficacy and safety of paste formulations of firocoxib and phenylbutazone in horses with naturally occurring osteoarthritis.

Design—Randomized controlled clinical trial.

Animals—253 client-owned horses with naturally occurring osteoarthritis.

Procedures—Horses were treated with firocoxib (0.1 mg/kg [0.045 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h) or phenylbutazone (4.4 mg/kg [2 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h) for 14 days. Physical examinations and lameness evaluations were performed prior to treatment and after 7 and 14 days. Clinical improvement was defined as a reduction of at least 1 lameness grade or a combined reduction of at least 3 points in scores for pain during manipulation or palpation, joint swelling, joint circumference, and range of motion.

Results—Proportion of horses clinically improved on day 14 for the firocoxib group (104/123 [84.6%]) was not significantly different from the proportion for the phenylbutazone group (103/119 [86.6%]). Proportion of horses that were improved on day 14 was significantly greater for horses treated with firocoxib than for horses treated with phenylbutazone with regard to score for pain on manipulation or palpation (P = 0.028), joint circumference score (P = 0.026), and range of motion score (P = 0.012), but not for overall lameness score or joint swelling score. No direct treatment-related adverse effects were detected during the study.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that overall clinical efficacy of a paste formulation of firocoxib in horses with naturally occurring osteoarthritis was comparable to efficacy of a paste formulation of phenylbutazone.

Contributor Notes

Presented at the 25th Annual Meeting of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Seattle, June 2007.

Supported by Merial Ltd, Duluth, Ga.

Address correspondence to Dr. Doucet.