Serologic and reproductive findings after a herpesvirus-1 abortion storm in goats

Morgan H. McCoy Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center, Department of Veterinary Science, University of Kentucky, PO Box 14125, Lexington, KY 40512-4125

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 PhD
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Donald L. Montgomery Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82070

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 DVM, PhD, DACVP
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Ana C. Bratanich Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82070

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Jacque Cavender Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82070

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Patricia B. Scharko Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center, Department of Veterinary Science, University of Kentucky, PO Box 14125, Lexington, KY 40512-4125

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Mary Lynne Vickers Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center, Department of Veterinary Science, University of Kentucky, PO Box 14125, Lexington, KY 40512-4125

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Abstract

Case Description—An abortion storm occurred in a goat herd, resulting in 75 aborted kids and 1 neonatal death from December 2004 to February 2005.

Clinical Findings—Aborted fetuses ranged from being premature to past term. Laboratory findings in 4 of 5 aborted fetuses were consistent with herpesvirus abortion. A virus that yielded positive results with a fluorescent antibody test for bovine herpesvirus-1 was iso-lated and identified as caprine herpesvirus-1 (CpHV-1) via DNA sequence analysis.

Treatment and Outcome—Many does that aborted were rebred for kidding in late sum-mer. Most of the young wethers born in 2005 were sold; however, all of the young does were kept for breeding in fall. In November 2005, all 241 goats in the herd were tested for antibodies against CpHV-1 to identify goats that had seroconverted during the outbreak. No complications attributable to CpHV-1 were identified during kidding in 2006.

Clinical Relevance—On the basis of serologic findings, infection with CpHV-1 was not as-sociated with reduced reproductive success in the subsequent breeding.

Abstract

Case Description—An abortion storm occurred in a goat herd, resulting in 75 aborted kids and 1 neonatal death from December 2004 to February 2005.

Clinical Findings—Aborted fetuses ranged from being premature to past term. Laboratory findings in 4 of 5 aborted fetuses were consistent with herpesvirus abortion. A virus that yielded positive results with a fluorescent antibody test for bovine herpesvirus-1 was iso-lated and identified as caprine herpesvirus-1 (CpHV-1) via DNA sequence analysis.

Treatment and Outcome—Many does that aborted were rebred for kidding in late sum-mer. Most of the young wethers born in 2005 were sold; however, all of the young does were kept for breeding in fall. In November 2005, all 241 goats in the herd were tested for antibodies against CpHV-1 to identify goats that had seroconverted during the outbreak. No complications attributable to CpHV-1 were identified during kidding in 2006.

Clinical Relevance—On the basis of serologic findings, infection with CpHV-1 was not as-sociated with reduced reproductive success in the subsequent breeding.

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