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Comparison of the diagnosis and management of unilaterally castrated and cryptorchid horses at a referral hospital: 60 cases (2002–2006)

John F. Marshall BVMS1, Valerie J. Moorman DVM2, and H. David Moll DVM, MS, DACVS3
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078

Abstract

Objective—To determine the incidence of unilaterally castrated horses among horses admitted to the hospital for castration and to compare horses that underwent previous unilateral castration with horses that had cryptorchism.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—16 unilaterally castrated horses and 44 cryptorchid horses.

Procedures—Medical records of horses that were admitted to the veterinary medical teaching hospital for castration, including cryptorchid and unilaterally castrated horses, between January 2002 and December 2006 were reviewed. Medical records of unilaterally castrated horses and cryptorchid horses were examined for age, breed, history, diagnostic procedures, surgical technique of cryptorchidectomy, location of the retained testicle, and cost of surgery.

Results—Of 160 horses admitted for castration, 16 (10%) had undergone previous unilateral castration and 44 (27.5%) had cryptorchidism. Unilaterally castrated horses were significantly older than cryptorchid horses. No significant difference was found in left versus right distribution of testicles. No significant difference was found in abdominal versus inguinal distribution of left-sided testicles. Unilaterally castrated horses had a significantly lower proportion of right inguinal testicles, compared with cryptorchid horses. The cost of diagnosis and management of unilaterally castrated horses was significantly greater than in cryptorchid horses.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that the distribution of retained testicles is significantly different in unilaterally castrated horses, compared with cryptorchid horses, which may affect the selection of diagnostic and surgical approaches to unilaterally castrated horses.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the incidence of unilaterally castrated horses among horses admitted to the hospital for castration and to compare horses that underwent previous unilateral castration with horses that had cryptorchism.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—16 unilaterally castrated horses and 44 cryptorchid horses.

Procedures—Medical records of horses that were admitted to the veterinary medical teaching hospital for castration, including cryptorchid and unilaterally castrated horses, between January 2002 and December 2006 were reviewed. Medical records of unilaterally castrated horses and cryptorchid horses were examined for age, breed, history, diagnostic procedures, surgical technique of cryptorchidectomy, location of the retained testicle, and cost of surgery.

Results—Of 160 horses admitted for castration, 16 (10%) had undergone previous unilateral castration and 44 (27.5%) had cryptorchidism. Unilaterally castrated horses were significantly older than cryptorchid horses. No significant difference was found in left versus right distribution of testicles. No significant difference was found in abdominal versus inguinal distribution of left-sided testicles. Unilaterally castrated horses had a significantly lower proportion of right inguinal testicles, compared with cryptorchid horses. The cost of diagnosis and management of unilaterally castrated horses was significantly greater than in cryptorchid horses.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that the distribution of retained testicles is significantly different in unilaterally castrated horses, compared with cryptorchid horses, which may affect the selection of diagnostic and surgical approaches to unilaterally castrated horses.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Marshall's present address is the College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

Address correspondence Dr. Marshall.