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Pharmacokinetics of an extended-release theophylline product in cats

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  • 1 Wheat Ridge Veterinary Specialists, Wheat Ridge Animal Hospital, 3695 Kipling St, Wheat Ridge, CO 80033
  • | 2 Wheat Ridge Veterinary Specialists, Wheat Ridge Animal Hospital, 3695 Kipling St, Wheat Ridge, CO 80033
  • | 3 Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606
  • | 4 Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of a brand of extended-release theophylline tablets and capsules in healthy cats.

Design—Randomized 3-way crossover study.

Animals—6 healthy cats.

Procedures—A single dose of aminophylline (10 mg/kg [4.5 mg/lb], IV), a 100-mg extended-release theophylline tablet, or a 125-mg extended-release theophylline capsule was administered to all cats. Plasma samples were collected via preplaced central catheters throughout a 36-hour period. Plasma samples were frozen until analyzed by use of a fluorescence polarization monoclonal immunoassay.

Results—All cats tolerated drug administration and plasma collection with no adverse effects. Peak concentrations were reached for both orally administered products between 8 and 12 hours after administration. Bioavailability was excellent. Plasma concentrations were within the human therapeutic concentration of 5 to 20 μg/mL.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Daily administration of the brand of theophylline tablets and capsules used in this study at 15 mg/kg (6.8 mg/lb) and 19 mg/kg (8.6 mg/lb), respectively, maintained plasma concentrations within the desired therapeutic range in healthy cats.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of a brand of extended-release theophylline tablets and capsules in healthy cats.

Design—Randomized 3-way crossover study.

Animals—6 healthy cats.

Procedures—A single dose of aminophylline (10 mg/kg [4.5 mg/lb], IV), a 100-mg extended-release theophylline tablet, or a 125-mg extended-release theophylline capsule was administered to all cats. Plasma samples were collected via preplaced central catheters throughout a 36-hour period. Plasma samples were frozen until analyzed by use of a fluorescence polarization monoclonal immunoassay.

Results—All cats tolerated drug administration and plasma collection with no adverse effects. Peak concentrations were reached for both orally administered products between 8 and 12 hours after administration. Bioavailability was excellent. Plasma concentrations were within the human therapeutic concentration of 5 to 20 μg/mL.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Daily administration of the brand of theophylline tablets and capsules used in this study at 15 mg/kg (6.8 mg/lb) and 19 mg/kg (8.6 mg/lb), respectively, maintained plasma concentrations within the desired therapeutic range in healthy cats.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Guenther-Yenke's present address is Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Critical Care, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

Supported by the Veterinary Information Network and Wheat Ridge Animal Hospital.

Presented in abstract form at the 24th Symposium of the Veterinary Comparative Respiratory Society, Jena, Germany, October 2006.

Address correspondence to Dr. Guenther-Yenke.