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Frequency of urinary tract infection in catheterized dogs and comparison of bacterial culture and susceptibility testing results for catheterized and noncatheterized dogs with urinary tract infections

Loretta J. Bubenik DVM, MS, DACVS1, Giselle L. Hosgood BVSc, DACVS, PhD2, Don R. Waldron DVM, DACVS, DABVP3, and Lynne A. Snow DVM4
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
  • | 3 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA 24061
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803

Abstract

Objective—To determine frequency of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in catheterized dogs that had intervertebral disk disease (IVDD) or disease other than IVDD and compare bacterial culture and susceptibility testing results for catheterized and noncatheterized dogs with UTIs.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—147 catheterized dogs (105 with IVDD and 42 with other diseases) and 99 noncatheterized dogs with UTIs.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed for signalment, history, clinical problem, duration of urinary tract catheterization, administration of drugs, and urine bacterial culture and susceptibility testing results.

Results—Forty-two percent (44/105) of dogs with IVDD and 55% (23/42) of dogs with other diseases had UTIs; this difference was not significant. For catheterized dogs, the odds of UTI were increased by 20% for each year increase in age, 27% for each day increase in duration of catheterization, and 454% with antimicrobial administration. Escherichia coli and Proteus spp were more frequently isolated from noncatheterized dogs, whereas Enterobacter spp and Staphylococcus spp were more frequently isolated from catheterized dogs. There was no significant difference in frequency of 1, 2, or 3 isolates between groups. Proportions of antimicrobials to which the most frequently isolated bacteria were resistant were not significantly different between groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that urinary tract catheterization is a reasonable alternative for management of dogs with urinary bladder dysfunction, but that duration of catheterization should be minimized and indiscriminate antimicrobial administration to dogs with indwelling urinary catheters should be avoided.

Abstract

Objective—To determine frequency of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in catheterized dogs that had intervertebral disk disease (IVDD) or disease other than IVDD and compare bacterial culture and susceptibility testing results for catheterized and noncatheterized dogs with UTIs.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—147 catheterized dogs (105 with IVDD and 42 with other diseases) and 99 noncatheterized dogs with UTIs.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed for signalment, history, clinical problem, duration of urinary tract catheterization, administration of drugs, and urine bacterial culture and susceptibility testing results.

Results—Forty-two percent (44/105) of dogs with IVDD and 55% (23/42) of dogs with other diseases had UTIs; this difference was not significant. For catheterized dogs, the odds of UTI were increased by 20% for each year increase in age, 27% for each day increase in duration of catheterization, and 454% with antimicrobial administration. Escherichia coli and Proteus spp were more frequently isolated from noncatheterized dogs, whereas Enterobacter spp and Staphylococcus spp were more frequently isolated from catheterized dogs. There was no significant difference in frequency of 1, 2, or 3 isolates between groups. Proportions of antimicrobials to which the most frequently isolated bacteria were resistant were not significantly different between groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that urinary tract catheterization is a reasonable alternative for management of dogs with urinary bladder dysfunction, but that duration of catheterization should be minimized and indiscriminate antimicrobial administration to dogs with indwelling urinary catheters should be avoided.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Bubenik.