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ECG of the Month

Allison K. Adams DVM1 and Bruce W. Keene DVM, MSc, DACVIM2
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  • 1 Cardiology Section, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.
  • | 2 Cardiology Section, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

A7-month-old 10-kg (22-lb) sexually intact male Boston Terrier was referred to the North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine for evaluation of a systolic murmur that had been present since birth. The dog had no clinical signs until 4 days prior to referral, when the owner noticed abdominal distention and lethargy. The referring veterinarian had prescribed furosemide (2.5 mg/kg [1.2 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h) and enalapril (0.5 mg/kg [0.23 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h) for this dog; there was a history of multiple littermate deaths attributed to presumed cardiac causes.

At the initial evaluation at the hospital, the

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Keene.