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Incidence of and risk factors for diabetes mellitus in cats that have undergone renal transplantation: 187 cases (1986–2005)

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  • 1 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616
  • | 2 Departments of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616
  • | 3 Departments of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616
  • | 4 Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104
  • | 5 Departments of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616
  • | 6 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616
  • | 7 Departments of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616
  • | 8 Departments of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616

Abstract

Objective—To compare incidence of diabetes mellitus in cats that had undergone renal transplantation with incidence in cats with chronic renal failure, compare mortality rates in cats that underwent renal transplantation and did or did not develop diabetes mellitus, and identify potential risk factors for development of posttransplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) in cats.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—187 cats that underwent renal transplantation.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed.

Results—26 of the 187 (13.9%) cats developed PTDM, with the incidence of PTDM being 66 cases/1,000 cat years at risk. By contrast, the incidence of diabetes mellitus among a comparison population of 178 cats with chronic renal failure that did not undergo renal transplantation was 17.9 cases/1,000 cat years at risk, and cats that underwent renal trans-plantation were 5.45 times as likely to develop diabetes mellitus as were control cats with chronic renal failure. The mortality rate among cats with PTDM was 2.38 times the rate among cats that underwent renal transplantation but did not develop PTDM. Age, sex, body weight, and percentage change in body weight were not found to be significantly associ-ated with development of PTDM.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that cats that undergo renal transplantation have an increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus, compared with cats with chronic renal failure, and that mortality rate is higher for cats that develop PTDM than for cats that do not.

Abstract

Objective—To compare incidence of diabetes mellitus in cats that had undergone renal transplantation with incidence in cats with chronic renal failure, compare mortality rates in cats that underwent renal transplantation and did or did not develop diabetes mellitus, and identify potential risk factors for development of posttransplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) in cats.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—187 cats that underwent renal transplantation.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed.

Results—26 of the 187 (13.9%) cats developed PTDM, with the incidence of PTDM being 66 cases/1,000 cat years at risk. By contrast, the incidence of diabetes mellitus among a comparison population of 178 cats with chronic renal failure that did not undergo renal transplantation was 17.9 cases/1,000 cat years at risk, and cats that underwent renal trans-plantation were 5.45 times as likely to develop diabetes mellitus as were control cats with chronic renal failure. The mortality rate among cats with PTDM was 2.38 times the rate among cats that underwent renal transplantation but did not develop PTDM. Age, sex, body weight, and percentage change in body weight were not found to be significantly associ-ated with development of PTDM.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that cats that undergo renal transplantation have an increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus, compared with cats with chronic renal failure, and that mortality rate is higher for cats that develop PTDM than for cats that do not.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Kyles.