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Subtotal penile amputation and preputial urethrostomy in a dog

Michael M. Pavletic DVM, DACVS1 and Susan A. O'Bell DVM2
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  • 1 Department of Surgery, Angell Animal Medical Center, 350 S Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02130.
  • | 2 Department of Medicine, Angell Animal Medical Center, 350 S Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02130.

Abstract

Case Description—A 6-year-old castrated male Shih Tzu was evaluated because of intermittent bleeding during urination.

Clinical Findings—Necrosis of the cranial portion of the penile shaft extended distally from the preputial fornix. Penile necrosis secondary to strangulation from paraphimosis was diagnosed.

Treatment and Outcome—A midline preputiotomy incision was used to expose the penile shaft; amputation was performed caudal to the preputial fornix. The terminal portion of the urethra was anastomosed to the preputial mucosa, which allowed the dog to urinate through the preputial orifice.

Clinical Relevance—Unlike the more conventional urethrostomy procedures performed in dogs, preputial urethrostomy eliminates the potential for local skin irritation during urination. Preputial urethrostomy is also easier to perform in those dogs in which penile amputation is required adjacent to the preputial fornix. A release incision cranial to the prepuce can be used to facilitate caudal displacement of the preputial mucosa, which facilitates urethral anastomosis to this structure. A midline preputiotomy incision provided excellent exposure of the penile shaft for this surgical procedure.

Abstract

Case Description—A 6-year-old castrated male Shih Tzu was evaluated because of intermittent bleeding during urination.

Clinical Findings—Necrosis of the cranial portion of the penile shaft extended distally from the preputial fornix. Penile necrosis secondary to strangulation from paraphimosis was diagnosed.

Treatment and Outcome—A midline preputiotomy incision was used to expose the penile shaft; amputation was performed caudal to the preputial fornix. The terminal portion of the urethra was anastomosed to the preputial mucosa, which allowed the dog to urinate through the preputial orifice.

Clinical Relevance—Unlike the more conventional urethrostomy procedures performed in dogs, preputial urethrostomy eliminates the potential for local skin irritation during urination. Preputial urethrostomy is also easier to perform in those dogs in which penile amputation is required adjacent to the preputial fornix. A release incision cranial to the prepuce can be used to facilitate caudal displacement of the preputial mucosa, which facilitates urethral anastomosis to this structure. A midline preputiotomy incision provided excellent exposure of the penile shaft for this surgical procedure.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Pavletic.