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Evaluation of clinical status, renal function, and hematopoietic variables after unilateral nephrectomy in canine kidney donors

Bridget K. Urie MA1,2, D. Michael Tillson DVM, MS, DACVS3, Christopher M. Smith BS4,5, William R. Brawner DVM, MS, DACVR6, Gregory T. Almond DVM, MS7, Debra M. Beard DVM, MS, DACVR8, Stephen D. Lenz DVM, PhD, DACVP9, and Clinton D. Lothrop Jr DVM, PhD, DACVIM10
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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849
  • | 2 Scott-Richey Research Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849
  • | 4 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849
  • | 5 Scott-Richey Research Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849
  • | 6 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849
  • | 7 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849
  • | 8 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849
  • | 9 Department of Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2026
  • | 10 Scott-Richey Research Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849

Abstract

Objective—To determine clinical status and renal and hematopoietic function after kidney donation and identify risks associated with kidney donation in dogs.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—14 dogs that underwent unilateral nephrectomy for kidney donation.

Procedures—Records were reviewed retrospectively to collect data regarding prenephrectomy clinicopathologic variables. Dogs were reexamined prospectively at various times after nephrectomy, and pre- and postnephrectomy CBC, serum biochemical analyses, urinalysis, and urine protein-to-urine creatinine ratio were compared. Six dogs had postnephrectomy renal volume determined ultrasonographically, and 4 of those dogs also underwent scintigraphic determination of glomerular filtration rate and renal biopsy.

Results—All dogs were clinically normal at the time of reevaluation. There were no significant differences between prenephrectomy and postnephrectomy values for BUN concentration or urine specific gravity. Mean postnephrectomy serum creatinine concentration was significantly greater than prenephrectomy concentration. Mean serum phosphorus concentration was significantly decreased after nephrectomy, and mean Hct, corpuscular volume, and corpuscular hemoglobin concentration were significantly increased after nephrectomy. Postnephrectomy renal volume was greatest in dogs < 12 months old at the time of surgery. Mean postnephrectomy glomerular filtration rate was 2.82 ± 1.12 mL/kg/ min (1.28 ± 0.51 mL/lb/min). Renal biopsy specimens obtained during and after nephrectomy were histologically normal.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Renal and hematopoietic variables were within reference ranges in dogs examined up to 2.5 years after unilateral nephrectomy. Compensatory renal hypertrophy was greatest in dogs < 1 year of age at donation. Donor age, along with histocompatability, may be an important factor in selecting dogs for kidney donation.

Abstract

Objective—To determine clinical status and renal and hematopoietic function after kidney donation and identify risks associated with kidney donation in dogs.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—14 dogs that underwent unilateral nephrectomy for kidney donation.

Procedures—Records were reviewed retrospectively to collect data regarding prenephrectomy clinicopathologic variables. Dogs were reexamined prospectively at various times after nephrectomy, and pre- and postnephrectomy CBC, serum biochemical analyses, urinalysis, and urine protein-to-urine creatinine ratio were compared. Six dogs had postnephrectomy renal volume determined ultrasonographically, and 4 of those dogs also underwent scintigraphic determination of glomerular filtration rate and renal biopsy.

Results—All dogs were clinically normal at the time of reevaluation. There were no significant differences between prenephrectomy and postnephrectomy values for BUN concentration or urine specific gravity. Mean postnephrectomy serum creatinine concentration was significantly greater than prenephrectomy concentration. Mean serum phosphorus concentration was significantly decreased after nephrectomy, and mean Hct, corpuscular volume, and corpuscular hemoglobin concentration were significantly increased after nephrectomy. Postnephrectomy renal volume was greatest in dogs < 12 months old at the time of surgery. Mean postnephrectomy glomerular filtration rate was 2.82 ± 1.12 mL/kg/ min (1.28 ± 0.51 mL/lb/min). Renal biopsy specimens obtained during and after nephrectomy were histologically normal.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Renal and hematopoietic variables were within reference ranges in dogs examined up to 2.5 years after unilateral nephrectomy. Compensatory renal hypertrophy was greatest in dogs < 1 year of age at donation. Donor age, along with histocompatability, may be an important factor in selecting dogs for kidney donation.

Contributor Notes

Supported by the Morris Animal Foundation (Grant D02CA-76), Merck-Merial Veterinary Scholars Program, and Scott-Richey Research Center.

Address correspondence to Dr. Lothrop.