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Evaluation of risk factors for development of secondary glaucoma in dogs: 156 cases (1999–2004)

Devin A. J. JohnsenDepartments of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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David J. MaggsDepartments of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Philip H. KassDepartments of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine the immediately antecedent cause of secondary glaucoma and the prevalence of secondary glaucoma with anterior uveitis or lens dislocation in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—156 dogs with secondary glaucoma.

Procedures—Cause of glaucoma was determined from records. Breed, age, sex, and neuter status of all dogs with secondary glaucoma were compared with the general hospital population. The prevalence of secondary glaucoma in dogs with a primary diagnosis of lens dislocation or anterior uveitis during the same period was determined.

Results—Secondary glaucoma was diagnosed in 156 of 2,257 (6.9%) dogs examined because of ophthalmic disease and was bilateral in 33 (21.2%) of those dogs. In 31 (94%) bilaterally affected dogs, the antecedent cause was the same in both eyes. Common causes of secondary glaucoma were non-surgical anterior uveitis (44.9%), anterior uveitis associated with prior phacoemulsification (15.8%), and lens dislocation (15.2%). Parson Russell Terriers, Poodles, Boston Terriers, Cocker Spaniels, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, and Australian Cattle Dogs had diagnoses of secondary glaucoma more often than expected, compared with the reference population. Age, sex, neuter status, and laterality were not associated with secondary glaucoma. The prevalence of secondary glaucoma in dogs with lens dislocation or uveitis was 15% or 17%, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Glaucoma develops secondary to many intraocular diseases, particularly uveitis and lens dislocation. Diagnosis of these diseases should prompt frequent monitoring of intraocular pressure, regardless of signalment.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the immediately antecedent cause of secondary glaucoma and the prevalence of secondary glaucoma with anterior uveitis or lens dislocation in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—156 dogs with secondary glaucoma.

Procedures—Cause of glaucoma was determined from records. Breed, age, sex, and neuter status of all dogs with secondary glaucoma were compared with the general hospital population. The prevalence of secondary glaucoma in dogs with a primary diagnosis of lens dislocation or anterior uveitis during the same period was determined.

Results—Secondary glaucoma was diagnosed in 156 of 2,257 (6.9%) dogs examined because of ophthalmic disease and was bilateral in 33 (21.2%) of those dogs. In 31 (94%) bilaterally affected dogs, the antecedent cause was the same in both eyes. Common causes of secondary glaucoma were non-surgical anterior uveitis (44.9%), anterior uveitis associated with prior phacoemulsification (15.8%), and lens dislocation (15.2%). Parson Russell Terriers, Poodles, Boston Terriers, Cocker Spaniels, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, and Australian Cattle Dogs had diagnoses of secondary glaucoma more often than expected, compared with the reference population. Age, sex, neuter status, and laterality were not associated with secondary glaucoma. The prevalence of secondary glaucoma in dogs with lens dislocation or uveitis was 15% or 17%, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Glaucoma develops secondary to many intraocular diseases, particularly uveitis and lens dislocation. Diagnosis of these diseases should prompt frequent monitoring of intraocular pressure, regardless of signalment.

Contributor Notes

Supported in part by the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine STAR (Students Training in Advanced Research) Program by a grant from the Merck-Merial Veterinary Scholars Research Program.

Address correspondence to Dr. Maggs.