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Intramuscular administration of a low dose of ACTH for ACTH stimulation testing in dogs

Ellen N. BehrendDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849.

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 VMD, PhD, DACVIM
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Robert J. KemppainenDepartment of Anatomy, Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849.

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David S. BruyetteVCA West Los Angeles Animal Hospital, 1818 S Sepulveda Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90025.

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Katherine A. BuschDepartment of Anatomy, Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849.

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Hollie P. LeeDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849.

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Abstract

Objective—To compare adrenal gland stimulation achieved following administration of cosyntropin (5 μg/kg [2.3 μg/lb]) IM versus IV in healthy dogs and dogs with hyperadrenocorticism.

Design—Clinical trial.

Animals—9 healthy dogs and 9 dogs with hyperadrenocorticism.

Procedures—In both groups, ACTH stimulation was performed twice. Healthy dogs were randomly assigned to receive cosyntropin IM or IV first, but all dogs with hyperadrenocorticism received cosyntropin IV first. In healthy dogs, serum cortisol concentration was measured before (baseline) and 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after cosyntropin administration. In dogs with hyperadrenocorticism, serum cortisol concentration was measured before and 60 minutes after cosyntropin administration.

Results—In the healthy dogs, serum cortisol concentration increased significantly after administration of cosyntropin, regardless of route of administration, and serum cortisol concentrations after IM administration were not significantly different from concentrations after IV administration. For both routes of administration, serum cortisol concentration peaked 60 or 90 minutes after cosyntropin administration. In dogs with hyperadrenocorticism, serum cortisol concentration was significantly increased 60 minutes after cosyntropin administration, compared with baseline concentration, and concentrations after IM administration were not significantly different from concentrations after IV administration.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that in healthy dogs and dogs with hyperadrenocorticism, administration of cosyntropin at a dose of 5 μg/kg, IV or IM, resulted in equivalent adrenal gland stimulation.

Abstract

Objective—To compare adrenal gland stimulation achieved following administration of cosyntropin (5 μg/kg [2.3 μg/lb]) IM versus IV in healthy dogs and dogs with hyperadrenocorticism.

Design—Clinical trial.

Animals—9 healthy dogs and 9 dogs with hyperadrenocorticism.

Procedures—In both groups, ACTH stimulation was performed twice. Healthy dogs were randomly assigned to receive cosyntropin IM or IV first, but all dogs with hyperadrenocorticism received cosyntropin IV first. In healthy dogs, serum cortisol concentration was measured before (baseline) and 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after cosyntropin administration. In dogs with hyperadrenocorticism, serum cortisol concentration was measured before and 60 minutes after cosyntropin administration.

Results—In the healthy dogs, serum cortisol concentration increased significantly after administration of cosyntropin, regardless of route of administration, and serum cortisol concentrations after IM administration were not significantly different from concentrations after IV administration. For both routes of administration, serum cortisol concentration peaked 60 or 90 minutes after cosyntropin administration. In dogs with hyperadrenocorticism, serum cortisol concentration was significantly increased 60 minutes after cosyntropin administration, compared with baseline concentration, and concentrations after IM administration were not significantly different from concentrations after IV administration.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that in healthy dogs and dogs with hyperadrenocorticism, administration of cosyntropin at a dose of 5 μg/kg, IV or IM, resulted in equivalent adrenal gland stimulation.

Contributor Notes

Supported by the Endocrine Diagnostic Service, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University.

Presented in part at the 23rd Annual Veterinary Internal Medicine Forum, Baltimore, June 2005.

Address correspondence to Dr. Behrend.