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Outcome of desmoplasty and fasciotomy for desmitis involving the origin of the suspensory ligament in horses: 27 cases (1995–2004)

Christina A. HewesMarion DuPont Scott Equine Medical Center, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Leesburg, VA 20177.

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Nathaniel A. White IIMarion DuPont Scott Equine Medical Center, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Leesburg, VA 20177

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Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome of percutaneous ultrasound-guided desmoplasty with simultaneous fasciotomy for proximal suspensory desmitis (ie, desmitis of the origin of the suspensory ligament) in horses that have not responded to stall rest.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—27 horses.

Procedures—Medical records of horses with proximal suspensory desmitis treated by means of desmoplasty with fasciotomy were reviewed. Follow-up information was obtained through telephone conversations with owners and trainers of the horses or by examination of horses at the hospital.

Results—23 of the 27 (85%) horses, including 3 of 4 horses with forelimb lesions and 20 of 23 horses with hind limb lesions, were able to return to full work after surgery and rehabilitation. All horses had ultrasonographic evidence of healing of suspensory ligament lesions.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that desmoplasty with fasciotomy is a viable treatment option in horses with proximal suspensory desmitis that have not responded to stall rest.

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome of percutaneous ultrasound-guided desmoplasty with simultaneous fasciotomy for proximal suspensory desmitis (ie, desmitis of the origin of the suspensory ligament) in horses that have not responded to stall rest.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—27 horses.

Procedures—Medical records of horses with proximal suspensory desmitis treated by means of desmoplasty with fasciotomy were reviewed. Follow-up information was obtained through telephone conversations with owners and trainers of the horses or by examination of horses at the hospital.

Results—23 of the 27 (85%) horses, including 3 of 4 horses with forelimb lesions and 20 of 23 horses with hind limb lesions, were able to return to full work after surgery and rehabilitation. All horses had ultrasonographic evidence of healing of suspensory ligament lesions.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that desmoplasty with fasciotomy is a viable treatment option in horses with proximal suspensory desmitis that have not responded to stall rest.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Hewes' present address is Peninsula Equine, PO Box 7297, Menlo Park, CA 94028.

Address correspondence to Dr. Hewes.