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Comparison of two surgical techniques for management of intramural ureteral ectopia in dogs: 36 cases (1994–2004)

Philipp D. Mayhew BVM&S, DACVS1, Karla C. L. Lee VetMB, PhD2, Susan P. Gregory BVetMed, PhD3, and Daniel J. Brockman BVSc, DACVS4
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  • 1 Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome associated with intramural ureteral ectopia treated with 1 of 2 surgical techniques (neoureterostomy with ligation of the distal ureteral segment vs neoureterostomy with resection of the distal ureteral segment) and compare results of these 2 techniques in dogs.

Design—Multicenter retrospective case series.

Animals—36 dogs (15 treated with the ligation technique and 21 treated with the resection technique).

Procedures—Information was obtained from medical records. Long-term follow-up information was obtained by owner questionnaire.

Results—15 of 21 (71%) dogs in the resection group and 7 of 14 (50%) dogs in the ligation group still had urinary incontinence after surgery. Three of 20 (15%) dogs in the resection group and 4 of 14 (29%) dogs in the ligation group reportedly had multiple episodes of urinary tract infection following surgery. The outcome of surgery was judged to be excellent by the owners of 10 of 18 (56%) dogs in the resection group and 9 of 14 (64%) dogs in the ligation group. No significant differences were found between surgery treatment groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of the present study suggest that although most owners of dogs that undergo surgery for treatment of intramural ureteral ectopia consider the outcome of surgery to be excellent, substantial proportions of dogs will continue to have urinary incontinence and recurrent urinary tract infections after surgery. Findings do not provide any support to the hypothesis that the resection technique is superior to the ligation technique for management of dogs with intramural ureteral ectopia.

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome associated with intramural ureteral ectopia treated with 1 of 2 surgical techniques (neoureterostomy with ligation of the distal ureteral segment vs neoureterostomy with resection of the distal ureteral segment) and compare results of these 2 techniques in dogs.

Design—Multicenter retrospective case series.

Animals—36 dogs (15 treated with the ligation technique and 21 treated with the resection technique).

Procedures—Information was obtained from medical records. Long-term follow-up information was obtained by owner questionnaire.

Results—15 of 21 (71%) dogs in the resection group and 7 of 14 (50%) dogs in the ligation group still had urinary incontinence after surgery. Three of 20 (15%) dogs in the resection group and 4 of 14 (29%) dogs in the ligation group reportedly had multiple episodes of urinary tract infection following surgery. The outcome of surgery was judged to be excellent by the owners of 10 of 18 (56%) dogs in the resection group and 9 of 14 (64%) dogs in the ligation group. No significant differences were found between surgery treatment groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of the present study suggest that although most owners of dogs that undergo surgery for treatment of intramural ureteral ectopia consider the outcome of surgery to be excellent, substantial proportions of dogs will continue to have urinary incontinence and recurrent urinary tract infections after surgery. Findings do not provide any support to the hypothesis that the resection technique is superior to the ligation technique for management of dogs with intramural ureteral ectopia.

Contributor Notes

Presented at the annual meeting of the European College Veterinary Surgeons, Marcy L'Etoile, France, July 2005.

Address correspondence to Dr. Mayhew.