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Use of cisplatin-containing biodegradable beads for treatment of cutaneous neoplasia in equidae: 59 cases (2000–2004)

Christina A. HewesMarion DuPont Scott Equine Medical Center, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Leesburg, VA 20177.

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Kenneth E. SullinsMarion DuPont Scott Equine Medical Center, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Leesburg, VA 20177.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome for equids with cutaneous neoplasms treated with cisplatin-containing biodegradable beads, alone or in conjunction with debulking.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—56 horses, 1 zebra, 1 donkey, and 1 mule.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed. Follow-up information was obtained through telephone conversations with owners and trainers of the animals.

Results—22 tumors were sarcoids, 6 were fibrosarcomas, 1 was a fibroma, 2 were peripheral nerve sheath tumors, 11 were squamous cell carcinomas, 14 were melanomas (13 gray horses and 1 bay horse), 1 was a lymphosarcoma, 1 was an adenocarcinoma, and 1 was a basal cell tumor. Forty-five (76%) animals underwent conventional or laser debulking of the tumor prior to bead implantation. Forty of 48 (83%) animals for which long-term follow-up information was available were relapse free 2 years after treatment. This included 20 of 22 animals with spindle cell tumors (including 11/13 horses with sarcoids), 6 of 10 animals with squamous cell carcinomas, 13 of 14 animals with melanomas, and 2 of 3 animals with other tumor types. Adverse effects were minimal.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that implantation of cisplatin-containing biodegradable beads, with or without tumor debulking, may be an effective treatment for equidae with various cutaneous neoplasms.

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome for equids with cutaneous neoplasms treated with cisplatin-containing biodegradable beads, alone or in conjunction with debulking.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—56 horses, 1 zebra, 1 donkey, and 1 mule.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed. Follow-up information was obtained through telephone conversations with owners and trainers of the animals.

Results—22 tumors were sarcoids, 6 were fibrosarcomas, 1 was a fibroma, 2 were peripheral nerve sheath tumors, 11 were squamous cell carcinomas, 14 were melanomas (13 gray horses and 1 bay horse), 1 was a lymphosarcoma, 1 was an adenocarcinoma, and 1 was a basal cell tumor. Forty-five (76%) animals underwent conventional or laser debulking of the tumor prior to bead implantation. Forty of 48 (83%) animals for which long-term follow-up information was available were relapse free 2 years after treatment. This included 20 of 22 animals with spindle cell tumors (including 11/13 horses with sarcoids), 6 of 10 animals with squamous cell carcinomas, 13 of 14 animals with melanomas, and 2 of 3 animals with other tumor types. Adverse effects were minimal.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that implantation of cisplatin-containing biodegradable beads, with or without tumor debulking, may be an effective treatment for equidae with various cutaneous neoplasms.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Hewes' present address is Peninsula Equine, PO Box 7297, Menlo Park, CA 94028.

The authors thank Lea Ann Hansen of the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy for technical assistance.

Address correspondence to Dr. Hewes.