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Effectiveness of using a mat filled with a peroxygen disinfectant to minimize shoe sole contamination in a veterinary hospital

Sandra F. AmassDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2026.

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 DVM, PhD, DABVP
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Mimi ArighiVeterinary Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2026.

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Joann M. KinyonVeterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 500111250.

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Lorraine J. HoffmanVeterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 500111250.

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Jessica L. SchneiderDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2026.

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D. Kevin DraperVeterinary Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2026.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine the effectiveness of using a disinfectant mat filled with a peroxygen compound to prevent mechanical transmission of bacteria via contaminated footwear between the food animal ward and common breezeway of a veterinary teaching hospital.

Design—Observational study.

Sample Population—Shoe soles of individuals entering and exiting from the ward.

Procedures—A mat filled with peroxygen disinfectant was placed at the entrance to the food animal ward, and participants wiped each shoe twice on the mat surface (n = 16) or walked on the mat surface but did not wipe their shoes (17) before entering and exiting from the ward. Swab specimens were collected from the shoe soles of participants before and after mat use and submitted for bacterial culture.

Results—For both study days, as participants entered the ward, median number of aerobic bacteria isolated from shoe swab specimens collected prior to use of the disinfectant mat was not significantly different from median number isolated after use of the disinfectant mat. However, as participants exited the ward, median number of aerobic bacteria isolated from shoe swab specimens collected prior to use of the disinfectant mat was significantly higher than median number isolated after use of the disinfectant mat.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that placing a mat filled with a peroxygen disinfectant at the exit from the food animal ward of a veterinary teaching hospital may help reduce mechanical transmission of bacteria on the footwear of individuals leaving the ward.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effectiveness of using a disinfectant mat filled with a peroxygen compound to prevent mechanical transmission of bacteria via contaminated footwear between the food animal ward and common breezeway of a veterinary teaching hospital.

Design—Observational study.

Sample Population—Shoe soles of individuals entering and exiting from the ward.

Procedures—A mat filled with peroxygen disinfectant was placed at the entrance to the food animal ward, and participants wiped each shoe twice on the mat surface (n = 16) or walked on the mat surface but did not wipe their shoes (17) before entering and exiting from the ward. Swab specimens were collected from the shoe soles of participants before and after mat use and submitted for bacterial culture.

Results—For both study days, as participants entered the ward, median number of aerobic bacteria isolated from shoe swab specimens collected prior to use of the disinfectant mat was not significantly different from median number isolated after use of the disinfectant mat. However, as participants exited the ward, median number of aerobic bacteria isolated from shoe swab specimens collected prior to use of the disinfectant mat was significantly higher than median number isolated after use of the disinfectant mat.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that placing a mat filled with a peroxygen disinfectant at the exit from the food animal ward of a veterinary teaching hospital may help reduce mechanical transmission of bacteria on the footwear of individuals leaving the ward.

Contributor Notes

Supported by the Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine.

The authors thank Angie Delks and Michael A. Cadwallader for technical assistance.

Address correspondence to Dr. Amass.