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    Martin BB, Freeman DE, Ross MW, et al. Cecocolic and cecocecal intussusception in horses: 30 cases (1976–1996). J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999; 214: 8084.

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  • 1 Equine Health Studies Program, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.
  • | 2 Equine Health Studies Program, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.
History

A 1-year-old Thoroughbred was evaluated for signs of abdominal pain of a few hours' duration. Analgesics and sedatives had been administered by the referring veterinarian, but there was no improvement in the horse's clinical signs. The horse had been kept in a pasture with Bermuda grass hay, and a high-protein (16%) pelleted feed had been added to the diet 7 days prior to evaluation. On physical examination, the horse was alert and responsive; however, severe signs of pain and distress (sweating, kicking, and wanting to lie down) were detected. On physical examination, the horse had moderate tachycardia (56 beats/min;

History

A 1-year-old Thoroughbred was evaluated for signs of abdominal pain of a few hours' duration. Analgesics and sedatives had been administered by the referring veterinarian, but there was no improvement in the horse's clinical signs. The horse had been kept in a pasture with Bermuda grass hay, and a high-protein (16%) pelleted feed had been added to the diet 7 days prior to evaluation. On physical examination, the horse was alert and responsive; however, severe signs of pain and distress (sweating, kicking, and wanting to lie down) were detected. On physical examination, the horse had moderate tachycardia (56 beats/min;

Contributor Notes

Dr. Valdes-Martinez's present address is Department of Clinical Studies-Philadelphia, Section of Radiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3900 Delancey St, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010.

Dr. Valdes-Martinez.