• 1

    Sharp NJH. Aspergillosis and penicilliosis. In: Greene CE, ed. Infectious diseases of the dog and cat. Philadelphia: WB Saunders Co, 1998; 404413.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2

    Stanzani M, Orciuolo E, Lewis R, et al. Aspergillus fumigatus suppresses the human cellular immune response via gliotoxin-mediated apoptosis of monocytes. Blood 2005; 105: 22582265.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3

    Youngchim S, Morris-Jones R, Hay RJ, et al. Production of melanin by Aspergillus fumigatus. J Med Microbiol 2004; 53: 175181.

  • 4

    Panda NK, Balaji P, Chakrabarti A, et al. Paranasal sinus aspergillosis: its categorization to develop a treatment protocol. Mycoses 2004; 47: 277283.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5

    Harvey CE. Nasal aspergillosis and penicilliosis in dogs: results of treatment with thiabendazole. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1984; 184: 4850.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6

    Sharp NJH, Harvey CE, O'Brien JA. Treatment of canine nasal aspergillosis/penicilliosis with fluconazole (UK-49,858). J Small Anim Pract 1991; 32: 513516.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7

    Mathews KG, Koblik PD, Richardson EF, et al. Computed tomographic assessment of noninvasive intranasal infusions in dogs with fungal rhinitis. Vet Surg 1996; 25: 309319.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8

    Mathews KG, Davidson AP, Koblik PD, et al. Comparison of topical administration of clotrimazole through surgically placed versus nonsurgically placed catheters for treatment of nasal aspergillosis in dogs: 60 cases (1990–1996). J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998; 213: 501506.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9

    Zonderland JL, Stork CK, Saunders JH, et al. Intranasal infusion of enilconazole for treatment of sinonasal aspergillosis in dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002; 221: 14211425.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10

    Saunders JH, Clercx C, Snaps FR, et al. Radiographic, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomographic, and rhinoscopic features of nasal aspergillosis in dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004; 225: 17031712.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11

    Peeters D, Day MJ, Clercx C. An immunohistochemical study of canine nasal aspergillosis. J Comp Pathol 2005; 132: 283288.

  • 12

    Saunders JH, van Bree H. Comparison of radiography and computed tomography for the diagnosis of canine nasal aspergillosis. Vet Radiol Ultrasound 2003; 44: 414419.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13

    Saunders JH, Zonderland LJ, Clercx C, et al. Computed tomographic findings in 35 dogs with nasal aspergillosis. Vet Radiol Ultrasound 2002; 43: 59.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14

    Harvey CE, O'Brien JA. Nasal aspergillosis-penicilliosis. In: Kirk RW, ed. Current veterinary therapy VIII. Philadelphia: WB Saunders Co, 1983; 236240.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 15

    Richardson EF, Mathews KG. Distribution of topical agents in the frontal sinuses and nasal cavity of dogs: comparison between current protocols for treatment of nasal aspergillosis and a new noninvasive technique. Vet Surg 1995; 24: 476483.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Advertisement

Results of rhinoscopy alone or in conjunction with sinuscopy in dogs with aspergillosis: 46 cases (2001–2004)

Lynelle R. Johnson DVM, PhD, DACVIM1,2, Tracy L. Drazenovich DVM3, Melissa A. Herrera DVM4, and Erik R. Wisner DVM, DACVR5,6
View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 2 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 3 Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 4 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 5 Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 6 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Abstract

Objective—To determine results of diagnostic testing, including detection of nasal or frontal sinus fungal plaques, in dogs with nasal aspergillosis.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—46 dogs with nasal aspergillosis.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed for information on computed tomographic findings; rhinoscopic findings, including whether fungal plaques were seen in the nasal cavity; results of frontal sinus trephination and sinuscopy, including whether fungal plaques were seen in the frontal sinus; and results of histologic examination of biopsy specimens.

Results—In 38 (83%) dogs, fungal plaques were seen in the nasal cavity during rhinoscopy, whereas in the remaining 8 (17%), fungal plaques were not seen in the nasal cavity but were seen in the frontal sinus. Duration of clinical signs, proportions of dogs in which the referring veterinarian had performed a nasal examination prior to referral, proportions of dogs with computed tomographic evidence of nasal cavity cavitation or sinus involvement, and proportions of dogs with rhinoscopic evidence of destructive rhinitis were not significantly different between dogs with nasal fungal plaques and dogs with fungal plaques only in the frontal sinus.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results confirm that frontal sinus involvement is common in dogs with nasal aspergillosis and suggest that frontal sinus trephination and sinuscopy may aid in the diagnosis of aspergillosis in dogs, particularly dogs with rhinoscopic evidence of destructive rhinitis and computed tomographic evidence of sinus involvement that lack detectable fungal plaques in the nasal cavity.

Abstract

Objective—To determine results of diagnostic testing, including detection of nasal or frontal sinus fungal plaques, in dogs with nasal aspergillosis.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—46 dogs with nasal aspergillosis.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed for information on computed tomographic findings; rhinoscopic findings, including whether fungal plaques were seen in the nasal cavity; results of frontal sinus trephination and sinuscopy, including whether fungal plaques were seen in the frontal sinus; and results of histologic examination of biopsy specimens.

Results—In 38 (83%) dogs, fungal plaques were seen in the nasal cavity during rhinoscopy, whereas in the remaining 8 (17%), fungal plaques were not seen in the nasal cavity but were seen in the frontal sinus. Duration of clinical signs, proportions of dogs in which the referring veterinarian had performed a nasal examination prior to referral, proportions of dogs with computed tomographic evidence of nasal cavity cavitation or sinus involvement, and proportions of dogs with rhinoscopic evidence of destructive rhinitis were not significantly different between dogs with nasal fungal plaques and dogs with fungal plaques only in the frontal sinus.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results confirm that frontal sinus involvement is common in dogs with nasal aspergillosis and suggest that frontal sinus trephination and sinuscopy may aid in the diagnosis of aspergillosis in dogs, particularly dogs with rhinoscopic evidence of destructive rhinitis and computed tomographic evidence of sinus involvement that lack detectable fungal plaques in the nasal cavity.

Contributor Notes

Supported by the Bailey Wrigley Fund.

Presented in part at the 23rd Annual Forum of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Baltimore, June 2005.

Dr. Johnson.