• 1

    Hoffmann WE, Dorner JL. Separation of isoenzymes of canine alkaline phosphatase by cellulose acetate electrophoresis. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1975; 11: 283285.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2

    Saini PK, Saini SK. Origin of serum alkaline phosphatase in the dog. Am J Vet Res 1978; 39: 15101513.

  • 3

    Syakalima M, Takiguchi M, Yasuda J, et al.The age dependent levels of serum ALP isoenzymes and the diagnostic significance of corticosteroid-induced ALP during long-term glucocorticoid treatment. J Vet Med Sci 1997; 59: 905909.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4

    Bain PJ. Liver. In: Latimer KS, Mahaffey EA, Prasse KW, eds. Duncan and Prasse's veterinary laboratory medicine: clinical pathology. 4th ed. Ames, Iowa: Iowa State University Press, 2003; 193214.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5

    Hoe CM, Jabara AG. The use of serum enzymes as diagnostic aids in the dog. J Comp Pathol 1967; 77: 245254.

  • 6

    Siraganian PA, Mulvihill JJ, Mulivor RA, et al.Benign familial hyperphosphatemia. JAMA 1989; 261: 13101312.

  • 7

    Heino AE, Jokipii SG. Serum alkaline phosphatase levels in the aged. Ann Med Intern Fenn 1962; 51: 105109.

  • 8

    Lawler DF, Keltner DG, Hoffman WE, et al.Benign familial hyperphosphatemia in Siberian Huskies. Am J Vet Res 1996; 57: 612617.

  • 9

    Twedt DC. Scottish Terrier vacuolar hepatopathies, in Proceedings. North Am Vet Conf 2004; 490.

Advertisement

Serum alkaline phosphatase activity in Scottish Terriers versus dogs of other breeds

Derek D. NestorDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823.

Search for other papers by Derek D. Nestor in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, DACVIM
,
Kate M. HolanDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823.

Search for other papers by Kate M. Holan in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, DACVIM
,
Cheri A. JohnsonDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823.

Search for other papers by Cheri A. Johnson in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS, DACVIM
,
William SchallDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823.

Search for other papers by William Schall in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS, DACVIM
, and
John B. KaneenePopulation Medicine Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823.

Search for other papers by John B. Kaneene in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MPH, PhD

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether Scottish Terriers have higher serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities and a higher prevalence of diseases commonly associated with high serum ALP activity than do dogs of other breeds.

Design—Retrospective case-control study.

Animals—85 Scottish Terriers and 340 age-matched control dogs that were not Scottish Terriers.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed, and data for year of evaluation, age, sex, breed, serum ALP activity, and final diagnosis were recorded.

Results—Scottish Terriers had a significantly higher mean serum ALP activity than did control dogs (1,520 U/L vs 306 U/L). Regardless of breed, dogs that had a disease commonly associated with high serum ALP activity had a significantly higher mean serum ALP activity than did dogs without such diseases (1,304 U/L vs 427 U/L). Scottish Terriers were 2.4 times as likely to have a disease commonly associated with high serum ALP activity than were control dogs, but Scottish Terriers with diseases commonly associated with high serum ALP activity had a significantly higher mean ALP activity than did control dogs with such diseases (2,073 U/L vs 909 U/L), and Scottish Terriers without such diseases had a significantly higher mean serum ALP activity than did control dogs without such diseases (1,349 U/L vs 228 U/L).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that Scottish Terriers have higher serum ALP activities than do dogs of other breeds. Although Scottish Terriers also have a higher prevalence of diseases associated with high serum ALP activity, this alone did not explain the higher mean serum ALP activity in the breed.

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether Scottish Terriers have higher serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities and a higher prevalence of diseases commonly associated with high serum ALP activity than do dogs of other breeds.

Design—Retrospective case-control study.

Animals—85 Scottish Terriers and 340 age-matched control dogs that were not Scottish Terriers.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed, and data for year of evaluation, age, sex, breed, serum ALP activity, and final diagnosis were recorded.

Results—Scottish Terriers had a significantly higher mean serum ALP activity than did control dogs (1,520 U/L vs 306 U/L). Regardless of breed, dogs that had a disease commonly associated with high serum ALP activity had a significantly higher mean serum ALP activity than did dogs without such diseases (1,304 U/L vs 427 U/L). Scottish Terriers were 2.4 times as likely to have a disease commonly associated with high serum ALP activity than were control dogs, but Scottish Terriers with diseases commonly associated with high serum ALP activity had a significantly higher mean ALP activity than did control dogs with such diseases (2,073 U/L vs 909 U/L), and Scottish Terriers without such diseases had a significantly higher mean serum ALP activity than did control dogs without such diseases (1,349 U/L vs 228 U/L).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that Scottish Terriers have higher serum ALP activities than do dogs of other breeds. Although Scottish Terriers also have a higher prevalence of diseases associated with high serum ALP activity, this alone did not explain the higher mean serum ALP activity in the breed.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Nestor.

Dr. Nestor's present address is Animal Emergency and Referral Center of Central Iowa, 6110 Creston Ave, Des Moines, IA 50321.