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Septicemia in a young dog following treatment of patent ductus arteriosus via coil occlusion

Anne C. Wood DVM1, Deborah M. Fine DVM, MS, DACVIM2, Alan W. Spier DVM, PhD, DACVIM3, and George E. Eyster VMD, MS, DACVS4
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 4 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

Abstract

Case Description—A 12-week-old female English Springer Spaniel was evaluated for lethargy, vomiting, and pyrexia 1 week after treatment of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) via coil occlusion.

Clinical Findings—Test results were consistent with septicemia, and the assumption was made that the PDA occlusion coils were infected. Radiography revealed partial migration of the coil mass into the pulmonary artery and signs of congestive heart failure.

Treatment and Outcome—After successful treatment of the septicemia and heart failure, surgical removal of the coils and resection of the PDA were undertaken. Although the coil that embolized to the pulmonary vasculature was left in place, the dog's clinical signs resolved.

Clinical Relevance—This case highlights the fact that as PDA coil occlusion devices become more widely used in dogs, practitioners must be prepared to treat implant infections aggressively, with both medical and surgical interventions if necessary.

Abstract

Case Description—A 12-week-old female English Springer Spaniel was evaluated for lethargy, vomiting, and pyrexia 1 week after treatment of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) via coil occlusion.

Clinical Findings—Test results were consistent with septicemia, and the assumption was made that the PDA occlusion coils were infected. Radiography revealed partial migration of the coil mass into the pulmonary artery and signs of congestive heart failure.

Treatment and Outcome—After successful treatment of the septicemia and heart failure, surgical removal of the coils and resection of the PDA were undertaken. Although the coil that embolized to the pulmonary vasculature was left in place, the dog's clinical signs resolved.

Clinical Relevance—This case highlights the fact that as PDA coil occlusion devices become more widely used in dogs, practitioners must be prepared to treat implant infections aggressively, with both medical and surgical interventions if necessary.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Spier's present address is Florida Veterinary Specialists, 3000 Busch Lake Blvd, Tampa, FL 33614.

Address correspondence to Dr. Fine.