• 1

    McCarthy RN, Hutchins DR. Survival rates and post-operative complications after equine colic surgery. Aust Vet J 1988;65:4043.

  • 2

    Parry BW. Survey of 79 referral colic cases. Equine Vet J 1983;15:345348.

  • 3

    Pascoe PJ, McDonell WN, Trim CM, et al. Mortality rates and associated factors in equine colic operations—a retrospective study of 341 operations. Can Vet J 1983;24:7685.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4

    Stephen JO, Corley KT, Johnston JK, et al. Factors associated with mortality and morbidity in small intestinal volvulus in horses. Vet Surg 2004;33:340348.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5

    Stephen JO, Corley KT, Johnston JK, et al. Small intestinal volvulus in 115 horses: 1988–2000. Vet Surg 2004;33:333339.

  • 6

    Tinker MK, White NA, Lessard P, et al. Prospective study of equine colic incidence and mortality. Equine Vet J 1997;29:448453.

  • 7

    Leblond A, Villard I, Leblond L, et al. A retrospective evaluation of the causes of death of 448 insured French horses in 1995. Vet Res Commun 2000;24:85102.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8

    Freeman DE, Hammock P, Baker GJ, et al. Short- and longterm survival and prevalence of postoperative ileus after small intestinal surgery in the horse. Equine Vet J Suppl 2000;32:4251.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9

    Proudman CJ, Smith JE, Edwards GB, et al. Long-term survival of equine surgical colic cases. Part 2: modeling postoperative survival. Equine Vet J 2002;34:438443.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10

    Proudman CJ, Smith JE, Edwards GB, et al. Long-term survival of equine surgical colic cases. Part 1: patterns of mortality and morbidity. Equine Vet J 2002;34:432437.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11

    Ducharme NG, Hackett RP, Ducharme GR, et al. Surgical treatment of colic: results in 181 horses. Vet Surg 1983;12:206209.

  • 12

    Kersjes AW, Bras GE, Nemeth F, et al. Results of operative treatment of equine colic with special reference to surgery of the ileum. Vet Q 1988;10:1725.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13

    Semevolos SA, Ducharme NG, Hackett RP. Clinical assessment and outcome of three techniques for jejunal resection and anastomosis in horses: 59 cases (1989–2000). J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:215218.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14

    Phillips TJ, Walmsley JP. Retrospective analysis of the results of 151 exploratory laparotomies in horses with gastrointestinal disease. Equine Vet J 1993;25:427431.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 15

    Gleed R, Short CE. A retrospective study of the anesthetic management of adult draft horses. Vet Med Small Anim Clin 1980;75:14091416.

  • 16

    Kraus BM, Parente EJ, Tulleners EP. Laryngoplasty with ventriculectomy or ventriculocordectomy in 104 draft horses (1992–2000). Vet Surg 2003;32:530538.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17

    Geiser D. Chemical restraint and general anesthesia in the draft horse, in Proceedings. 35th Annu Meet Am Assoc Equine Pract 1989;461472.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18

    Young SS, Taylor PM. Factors influencing the outcome of equine anaesthesia: a review of 1,314 cases. Equine Vet J 1993;25:147151.

  • 19

    Richey MT, Holland MS, McGrath CJ, et al. Equine post-anesthetic lameness. A retrospective study. Vet Surg 1990;19:392397.

  • 20

    White NA. Epidemiology and etiology of colic. In: White NA, ed. Equine acute abdomen. Malvern, Pa: Lea & Febiger, 1990;4964.

Advertisement

Evaluation of surgical treatment for signs of acute abdominal pain in draft horses: 72 cases (1983–2002)

Ryan Rothenbuhler DVM1, Jan F. Hawkins DVM, DACVS2, Stephen B. Adams DVM, MS, DACVS3, Timothy B. Lescun BVSc, MS, DACVS4, Ann B. Weil MS, DVM, DACVA5, Lawrence T. Glickman VMD, DrPH6, John F. Fessler DVM, MS, DACVS7, and Nita G. Glickman PhD8
View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2026
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2026
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2026
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2026
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2026
  • | 6 Department of Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2026
  • | 7 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2026
  • | 8 Department of Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2026

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether heavy (≥ 680 kg [≥ 1,500 lb]) draft horses undergoing surgical treatment for acute signs of abdominal pain were at a greater risk for anesthetic and postoperative complications and lower postoperative survival rates than light (< 680 kg) draft horses.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—72 draft horses.

Procedures—Medical records of draft horses that underwent exploratory celiotomy for signs of acute abdominal pain from October 1983 to December 2002 were reviewed. Medical records of draft horses in which a celiotomy was performed for correction of reproductive abnormalities were not included in the study.

Results—When compared with light draft horses, heavy draft horses had longer durations of anesthesia, more postoperative complications, and lower survival rates. Seventy-six percent of horses that recovered from anesthesia had postoperative complications. Postoperative complications associated with low survival rates included myopathy and neuropathy, ileus, diarrhea, and endotoxemia. All horses with postoperative myopathy and neuropathy died or were euthanized. The short-term survival rate for horses that recovered from anesthesia was 60%. Horses undergoing small intestinal surgery had a worse prognosis for short-term survival than those undergoing large intestinal surgery. The survival rate for horses for which long-term (> 1 year) follow-up information was available was 50%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Draft horses weighing > 680 kg that underwent surgery because of acute signs of abdominal pain had longer durations of anesthesia, more postoperative complications, and higher mortality rates than draft horses weighing < 680 kg.

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether heavy (≥ 680 kg [≥ 1,500 lb]) draft horses undergoing surgical treatment for acute signs of abdominal pain were at a greater risk for anesthetic and postoperative complications and lower postoperative survival rates than light (< 680 kg) draft horses.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—72 draft horses.

Procedures—Medical records of draft horses that underwent exploratory celiotomy for signs of acute abdominal pain from October 1983 to December 2002 were reviewed. Medical records of draft horses in which a celiotomy was performed for correction of reproductive abnormalities were not included in the study.

Results—When compared with light draft horses, heavy draft horses had longer durations of anesthesia, more postoperative complications, and lower survival rates. Seventy-six percent of horses that recovered from anesthesia had postoperative complications. Postoperative complications associated with low survival rates included myopathy and neuropathy, ileus, diarrhea, and endotoxemia. All horses with postoperative myopathy and neuropathy died or were euthanized. The short-term survival rate for horses that recovered from anesthesia was 60%. Horses undergoing small intestinal surgery had a worse prognosis for short-term survival than those undergoing large intestinal surgery. The survival rate for horses for which long-term (> 1 year) follow-up information was available was 50%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Draft horses weighing > 680 kg that underwent surgery because of acute signs of abdominal pain had longer durations of anesthesia, more postoperative complications, and higher mortality rates than draft horses weighing < 680 kg.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Rothenbuhler