• 1

    Lord PF, Greiner TP, Greene RW, et al. Lung lobe torsion in the dog. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1973;9:473482.

  • 2

    Moser ES Jr, Proto AV. Lung torsion: case report and literature review. Radiology 1987;162:639643.

  • 3

    Dye TL, Teague HD, Poundstone ML. Lung lobe torsion in a cat with chronic feline asthma. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1998;34:493495.

  • 4

    Moon M, Fossum TW. Lung lobe torsion. In: Bonagura JD, ed. Kirk's current veterinary therapy XII: small animal practice. Philadelphia: WB Saunders Co, 1995;919921.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5

    Gallaher LA. Lung lobe torsion. In: Bojrab MJ, ed. Disease mechanisms in small animal surgery. 2nd ed. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger, 1993;386387.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6

    Rooney MB, Lanz O, Monnet E. Spontaneous lung lobe torsion in two Pugs. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 2001;37:128130.

  • 7

    Spranklin DB, Gulikers KP, Lanz OI. Recurrence of spontaneous lung lobe torsion in a Pug. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 2003;39:446451.

  • 8

    White RN, Corzo-Menendez N. Concurrent torsion of the right cranial and right middle lung lobes in a Whippet. J Small Anim Pract 2000;41:562565.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9

    Moses BL. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy for diagnosis of lung lobe torsion in a dog. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1980;176:4446.

  • 10

    Larsson S, Lepore V, Dernevik L, et al. Torsion of a lung lobe: diagnosis and treatment. Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 1988;36:281283.

  • 11

    Feeney DA, O'Brian TD, Klausner JS, et al. Recurring lung lobe torsion in three Afghan Hounds. J Am Vet Med Assoc 1984;184:842845.

  • 12

    Gelzer AR, Downs MO, Newell SM, et al. Accessory lung lobe torsion and chylothorax in an Afghan Hound. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 1997;33:171176.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13

    Neath PJ, Brockman DJ, King LG. Lung lobe torsion in dogs: 22 cases (1981–1999). J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:10411044.

Advertisement

Evaluation of lung lobe torsion in Pugs: 7 cases (1991–2004)

Kimberly A. Murphy DVM1 and Brigitte A. Brisson DMV, DVSc, DACVS2
View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether there is a predis-position for lung lobe torsion (LLT) in Pugs and describe clinical findings associated with LLT in that breed, compared with findings in other breeds.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—7 Pugs and 16 dogs of other breeds.

Procedure—Information collected from records included signalment, history, lung lobe affected, results of clinicopathologic testing, histologic findings, diagnostic imaging results, surgical treatment, and outcome.

Results—23 dogs were diagnosed with LLT, 10 of which were large-breed dogs and 13 of which were small-breed dogs. Seven of the small-breed dogs were Pugs. Pugs with LLT were significantly overrepresented, compared with the general hospital population. Affected Pugs ranged in age from 4.5 months to 4 years (median, 1.5 years). Six of the 7 Pugs had no predisposing conditions, and 6 were male. Six Pugs survived to discharge. Of the other small- and large-breed dogs, 3 of 6 and 5 of 10 survived to discharge, respectively. None of the Pugs were readmitted for complications or recurrence.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that young male Pugs may be predisposed to developing spontaneous LLT. The prognosis for survival and resolution of clinical signs in Pugs with LLT appeared to be excellent. Factors contributing to the development of LLT in Pugs are not known.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Murphy.