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Inheritance of rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament in Newfoundlands

Vicki L. WilkeDepartment of Animal Sciences, Center for Integrated Animal Genomics, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-1250
Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-1250

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Michael G. ConzemiusDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-1250

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Brian P. KinghornDepartment of Animal Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia

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Paula E. MacrossanDepartment of Animal Sciences, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia

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Weiguo CaiDepartment of Animal Sciences, Center for Integrated Animal Genomics, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-1250

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Max F. RothschildDepartment of Animal Sciences, Center for Integrated Animal Genomics, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-1250

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Abstract

Objective—To determine prevalence, level of inbreeding, heritability, and mode of inheritance for rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament (RCCL) in Newfoundlands.

Design—Retrospective and recruitment study.

Animals—574 client-owned Newfoundlands.

Procedure—Medical records from January 1, 1996, to December 31, 2002, were evaluated for prevalence of RCCL. A pedigree was constructed by use of recruited Newfoundlands with RCCL status based on results of veterinary examination; level of inbreeding, heritability, and mode of inheritance were calculated.

Results—Hospital prevalence for RCCL was 22%; dogs in the pedigree from the recruitment study had a mean level of inbreeding of 1.19 × 10−4, heritability of 0.27, and a possible recessive mode of inheritance with 51% penetrance for RCCL.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Identification of a genetic basis for RCCL in Newfoundlands provided evidence that investigators can now focus on developing methods to identify carriers to reduce the prevalence of RCCL.

Abstract

Objective—To determine prevalence, level of inbreeding, heritability, and mode of inheritance for rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament (RCCL) in Newfoundlands.

Design—Retrospective and recruitment study.

Animals—574 client-owned Newfoundlands.

Procedure—Medical records from January 1, 1996, to December 31, 2002, were evaluated for prevalence of RCCL. A pedigree was constructed by use of recruited Newfoundlands with RCCL status based on results of veterinary examination; level of inbreeding, heritability, and mode of inheritance were calculated.

Results—Hospital prevalence for RCCL was 22%; dogs in the pedigree from the recruitment study had a mean level of inbreeding of 1.19 × 10−4, heritability of 0.27, and a possible recessive mode of inheritance with 51% penetrance for RCCL.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Identification of a genetic basis for RCCL in Newfoundlands provided evidence that investigators can now focus on developing methods to identify carriers to reduce the prevalence of RCCL.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Wilke.

Supported by the American Kennel Club Canine Health Foundation; Orthopedic Research Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University; Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University; Special Research Initiation Grant, Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station; and Hatch and State of Iowa funds.

Presented at the 31st Veterinary Orthopedic Society Annual Conference, Big Sky, Mont, February 2004, and at the 14th American College of Veterinary Surgeons Symposium, Denver, October 2004.

The authors thank Drs. John Garbe and Yang Da for assistance with the pedigree.