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Outcome following surgical removal of nonvisceral soft tissue sarcomas in cats: 42 cases (1992–2000)

Christopher J. Dillon DVM1,2, G. Neal Mauldin DVM, DACVIM, DACVR3,4, and Keith E. Baer DVM, DACVP5
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  • 1 Animal Medical Center, 510 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10021.
  • | 2 Present address is Advanced Veterinary Cancer Care, 21 Hudson Valley Professional Plaza, Newburgh, NY 12550.
  • | 3 Animal Medical Center, 510 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10021.
  • | 4 Present address is the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.
  • | 5 Animal Medical Center, 510 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10021.

Abstract

Objective—To identify factors associated with outcome of cats with nonvisceral soft tissue sarcomas treated with surgery alone.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—42 cats.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed for clinically relevant data, and histologic samples were examined. Follow-up information was obtained by means of physical examination or through telephone conversations with referring veterinarians and owners. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to construct survival curves.

Results—Median survival time was 608 days (range, 85 to 2,291 days), although 24 cats were still alive at the time of the study. Tumor size (ie, diameter) and histologic type were significantly associated with survival time. Median survival time was significantly longer in cats with tumors that were < 2 cm in diameter, compared with cats in which tumors were > 2 cm. Median survival times for cats with a fibrosarcoma or nerve sheath tumor were significantly longer than median time for cats with a malignant fibrous histiocytoma.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that tumor size and type are significantly associated with survival time in cats with nonvisceral soft tissue tumors. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:1955–1957)

Abstract

Objective—To identify factors associated with outcome of cats with nonvisceral soft tissue sarcomas treated with surgery alone.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—42 cats.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed for clinically relevant data, and histologic samples were examined. Follow-up information was obtained by means of physical examination or through telephone conversations with referring veterinarians and owners. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to construct survival curves.

Results—Median survival time was 608 days (range, 85 to 2,291 days), although 24 cats were still alive at the time of the study. Tumor size (ie, diameter) and histologic type were significantly associated with survival time. Median survival time was significantly longer in cats with tumors that were < 2 cm in diameter, compared with cats in which tumors were > 2 cm. Median survival times for cats with a fibrosarcoma or nerve sheath tumor were significantly longer than median time for cats with a malignant fibrous histiocytoma.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that tumor size and type are significantly associated with survival time in cats with nonvisceral soft tissue tumors. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:1955–1957)