Advertisement

Secretion of sex hormones in dogs with adrenal dysfunction

Kate E. HillDepartment of Small Animal Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, West Lafayette, IN 47909.
Present address is the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.

Search for other papers by Kate E. Hill in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BVSc, DACVIM
,
J. Catharine R. Scott-MoncrieffDepartment of Small Animal Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, West Lafayette, IN 47909.

Search for other papers by J. Catharine R. Scott-Moncrieff in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 VetMB, MS, DACVIM
,
Mark A. KoshkoDepartment of Small Animal Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, West Lafayette, IN 47909.

Search for other papers by Mark A. Koshko in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Lawrence T. GlickmanDepartment of Veterinary Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, West Lafayette, IN 47909.

Search for other papers by Lawrence T. Glickman in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 VMD, DrPH
,
Nita W. GlickmanDepartment of Veterinary Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, West Lafayette, IN 47909.

Search for other papers by Nita W. Glickman in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
,
Richard W. NelsonDepartment of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by Richard W. Nelson in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, DACVIM
,
William E. BlevinsDepartment of Diagnostic Imaging, School of Veterinary Medicine, West Lafayette, IN 47909.

Search for other papers by William E. Blevins in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, DACVR
, and
Jack W. OliverDepartment of Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.

Search for other papers by Jack W. Oliver in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate adrenal sex hormone concentrations in response to ACTH stimulation in healthy dogs, dogs with adrenal tumors, and dogs with pituitary- dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH).

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—11 healthy control dogs, 9 dogs with adrenal-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (adenocarcinoma [ACA] or other tumor); 11 dogs with PDH, and 6 dogs with noncortisol-secreting adrenal tumors (ATs).

Procedure—Hyperadrenocorticism was diagnosed on the basis of clinical signs; physical examination findings; and results of ACTH stimulation test, low-dose dexamethasone suppression test, or both. Dogs with noncortisol-secreting ATs did not have hyperadrenocorticism but had ultrasonographic evidence of an AT. Concentrations of cortisol, androstenedione, estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and 17-hydroxyprogesterone were measured before and 1 hour after IM administration of 0.25 mg of synthetic ACTH.

Results—All dogs with ACA, 10 dogs with PDH, and 4 dogs with ATs had 1 or more sex hormone concentrations greater than the reference range after ACTH stimulation. The absolute difference for progesterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, and testosterone concentrations (value obtained after ACTH administration minus value obtained before ACTH administration) was significantly greater for dogs with ACA, compared with the other 3 groups. The absolute difference for androstenedione was significantly greater for dogs with ACA, compared with dogs with AT and healthy control dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dogs with ACA secrete increased concentrations of adrenal sex hormones, compared with dogs with PDH, noncortisol-secreting ATs, and healthy dogs. Dogs with noncortisol-secreting ATs also have increased concentrations of sex hormones. There is great interdog variability in sex hormone concentrations in dogs with ACA after stimulation with ACTH. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:556–561)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate adrenal sex hormone concentrations in response to ACTH stimulation in healthy dogs, dogs with adrenal tumors, and dogs with pituitary- dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH).

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—11 healthy control dogs, 9 dogs with adrenal-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (adenocarcinoma [ACA] or other tumor); 11 dogs with PDH, and 6 dogs with noncortisol-secreting adrenal tumors (ATs).

Procedure—Hyperadrenocorticism was diagnosed on the basis of clinical signs; physical examination findings; and results of ACTH stimulation test, low-dose dexamethasone suppression test, or both. Dogs with noncortisol-secreting ATs did not have hyperadrenocorticism but had ultrasonographic evidence of an AT. Concentrations of cortisol, androstenedione, estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and 17-hydroxyprogesterone were measured before and 1 hour after IM administration of 0.25 mg of synthetic ACTH.

Results—All dogs with ACA, 10 dogs with PDH, and 4 dogs with ATs had 1 or more sex hormone concentrations greater than the reference range after ACTH stimulation. The absolute difference for progesterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, and testosterone concentrations (value obtained after ACTH administration minus value obtained before ACTH administration) was significantly greater for dogs with ACA, compared with the other 3 groups. The absolute difference for androstenedione was significantly greater for dogs with ACA, compared with dogs with AT and healthy control dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dogs with ACA secrete increased concentrations of adrenal sex hormones, compared with dogs with PDH, noncortisol-secreting ATs, and healthy dogs. Dogs with noncortisol-secreting ATs also have increased concentrations of sex hormones. There is great interdog variability in sex hormone concentrations in dogs with ACA after stimulation with ACTH. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:556–561)