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Prevalence and radiologic and histologic appearance of vesicourachal diverticula in dogs without clinical signs of urinary tract disease

Karin Groesslinger DVM1,2, Tanja Tham DVM3, Monika Egerbacher DVM, PhD4, and Dragan Lorinson DVM, PhD5,6
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  • 1 Department of Surgery and Ophthalmology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Veterinärplatz 1, 1210 Vienna, Austria.
  • | 2 Present address is Small Animal Surgical Center, Neulinggasse 32/3, 1030 Vienna, Austria.
  • | 3 Veterinary Hospital Neulinggasse, Neulinggasse 32, 1030 Vienna, Austria.
  • | 4 Department of Histology and Embryology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Veterinärplatz 1, 1210 Vienna, Austria.
  • | 5 Department of Surgery and Ophthalmology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Veterinärplatz 1, 1210 Vienna, Austria.
  • | 6 Present address is Small Animal Surgical Center, Neulinggasse 32/3, 1030 Vienna, Austria.

Abstract

Objective—To determine prevalence and radiologic and histologic appearance of vesicourachal diverticula in dogs without clinical signs of urinary tract disease.

Design—Original study.

Animals—50 dogs between 4 months and 17 years old representing 22 breeds that had been euthanatized for unrelated reasons; none of the dogs had a history or clinical signs of urinary tract disease.

Procedure—Retrograde positive-contrast radiography was performed, and radiographs were examined for macroscopic diverticula. Necropsy specimens from the urinary bladder vertex were examined by means of light microscopy for diverticula and signs of inflammation.

Results—17 of the 50 (34%) dogs had vesicourachal diverticula, and 1 additional dog had a urachal cyst. Fifteen of the 17 diverticula were macroscopic; surface area of the diverticulum could be measured radiographically in 13 of these dogs and ranged from 1 to 90 mm2. The remaining 2 diverticula were microscopic. Sixteen diverticula were intramural and 1 was extramural. Light microscopic signs of bladder wall inflammation could be detected in 5 dogs, 4 of which had macroscopic diverticula.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that a high percentage of dogs without clinical signs of urinary tract disease may have vesicourethral diverticula. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical relevance of vesicourethral diverticula in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:383–386)

Abstract

Objective—To determine prevalence and radiologic and histologic appearance of vesicourachal diverticula in dogs without clinical signs of urinary tract disease.

Design—Original study.

Animals—50 dogs between 4 months and 17 years old representing 22 breeds that had been euthanatized for unrelated reasons; none of the dogs had a history or clinical signs of urinary tract disease.

Procedure—Retrograde positive-contrast radiography was performed, and radiographs were examined for macroscopic diverticula. Necropsy specimens from the urinary bladder vertex were examined by means of light microscopy for diverticula and signs of inflammation.

Results—17 of the 50 (34%) dogs had vesicourachal diverticula, and 1 additional dog had a urachal cyst. Fifteen of the 17 diverticula were macroscopic; surface area of the diverticulum could be measured radiographically in 13 of these dogs and ranged from 1 to 90 mm2. The remaining 2 diverticula were microscopic. Sixteen diverticula were intramural and 1 was extramural. Light microscopic signs of bladder wall inflammation could be detected in 5 dogs, 4 of which had macroscopic diverticula.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that a high percentage of dogs without clinical signs of urinary tract disease may have vesicourethral diverticula. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical relevance of vesicourethral diverticula in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:383–386)