Advertisement

Use of signal-averaged electrocardiography in the evaluation of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in Boxers

Alan W. SpierDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
Present address: Department of Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211.

Search for other papers by Alan W. Spier in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD, DACVIM
and
Kathryn M. MeursDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

Search for other papers by Kathryn M. Meurs in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Abstract

Objective—To assess signal-averaged electrocardiography (SAECG) for evaluation of Boxers with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and identify dogs at risk for sudden death (SD) or death related to congestive heart failure (CHF).

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—94 Boxers with ARVC and 49 clinically normal non-Boxers (controls).

Procedure—Boxers were screened for ARVC, and severity was estimated by use of echocardiography, 24-hour ambulatory ECG, and SAECG. Statistical evaluation was performed to identify significant differences in SAECG variables relative to clinical outcome, frequency of ventricular arrhythmias, and systolic function. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were evaluated for each SAECG variable for occurrence of SD or death related to CHF. Late potentials were also evaluated as a predictor of cardiac-related death.

Results—Differences were detected in SAECG variables on the basis of clinical outcome, systolic function, and frequency of ventricular arrhythmias. More severely affected dogs had significantly more abnormal SAECG findings. The presence of late potentials, defined as 2 abnormal root mean square values (of 4), was associated with high sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value for cardiac-related SD or death secondary to CHF.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that SAECG is a useful noninvasive diagnostic test to evaluate dogs affected with ARVC and identify individuals at risk for cardiac-related death. ( J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:1050–1055)

Abstract

Objective—To assess signal-averaged electrocardiography (SAECG) for evaluation of Boxers with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and identify dogs at risk for sudden death (SD) or death related to congestive heart failure (CHF).

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—94 Boxers with ARVC and 49 clinically normal non-Boxers (controls).

Procedure—Boxers were screened for ARVC, and severity was estimated by use of echocardiography, 24-hour ambulatory ECG, and SAECG. Statistical evaluation was performed to identify significant differences in SAECG variables relative to clinical outcome, frequency of ventricular arrhythmias, and systolic function. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were evaluated for each SAECG variable for occurrence of SD or death related to CHF. Late potentials were also evaluated as a predictor of cardiac-related death.

Results—Differences were detected in SAECG variables on the basis of clinical outcome, systolic function, and frequency of ventricular arrhythmias. More severely affected dogs had significantly more abnormal SAECG findings. The presence of late potentials, defined as 2 abnormal root mean square values (of 4), was associated with high sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value for cardiac-related SD or death secondary to CHF.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that SAECG is a useful noninvasive diagnostic test to evaluate dogs affected with ARVC and identify individuals at risk for cardiac-related death. ( J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:1050–1055)