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Prognostic factors for survival of dogs with inguinal and perineal mast cell tumors treated surgically with or without adjunctive treatment: 68 cases (1994–2002)

Alane Kosanovich CahalaneHarrington Oncology Program, Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536
Present address: Companion Animal Hospital, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6401.

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Sarah PayneHarrington Oncology Program, Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

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Lisa G. BarberHarrington Oncology Program, Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

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Lillian E. DudaDepartment of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6044.

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Carolyn J. HenryDepartment of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

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Glenna E. MauldinCancer Treatment Unit, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.

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Angela E. FrimbergerHarrington Oncology Program, Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

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Susan M. CotterHarrington Oncology Program, Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

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Antony S. MooreHarrington Oncology Program, Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine the prognostic factors for survival and tumor recurrence in dogs with cutaneous mast cell tumors (MCTs) in the perineal and inguinal regions treated surgically with or without adjunctive radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or both.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—68 dogs.

Procedure—Medical records of dogs with histologically confirmed MCTs in the perineal region, inguinal region, or both treated surgically with or without adjunctive radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or both were reviewed.

Results—Mean tumor-free interval was 1,635 days (median not reached), and 1- and 2-year tumor-free rates were 79% and 71%, respectively. Median survival time was 1,111 days (mean, 1,223 days), and 1- and 2-year survival rates were 79% and 61%, respectively. Factors that negatively influenced survival time were age at diagnosis, tumor recurrence, and treatment with lomustine.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that dogs with MCTs in the inguinal and perineal regions, if appropriately treated, may have survival times and tumor-free intervals similar to dogs with MCTs in other locations. ( J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:401–408)

Abstract

Objective—To determine the prognostic factors for survival and tumor recurrence in dogs with cutaneous mast cell tumors (MCTs) in the perineal and inguinal regions treated surgically with or without adjunctive radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or both.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—68 dogs.

Procedure—Medical records of dogs with histologically confirmed MCTs in the perineal region, inguinal region, or both treated surgically with or without adjunctive radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or both were reviewed.

Results—Mean tumor-free interval was 1,635 days (median not reached), and 1- and 2-year tumor-free rates were 79% and 71%, respectively. Median survival time was 1,111 days (mean, 1,223 days), and 1- and 2-year survival rates were 79% and 61%, respectively. Factors that negatively influenced survival time were age at diagnosis, tumor recurrence, and treatment with lomustine.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that dogs with MCTs in the inguinal and perineal regions, if appropriately treated, may have survival times and tumor-free intervals similar to dogs with MCTs in other locations. ( J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:401–408)