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Excision as treatment of dermal melanomatosis in horses: 11 cases (1994–2000)

Emma L. RoweMarion duPont Scott Equine Center, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Leesburg, VA 20176.

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Kenneth E. SullinsMarion duPont Scott Equine Center, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Leesburg, VA 20176.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether excision was an acceptable treatment for dermal melanomatosis in horses.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—11 horses with dermal melanomatosis involving the perineal, perianal, or perirectal region or ventral surface of the tail in which treatment consisted of tumor excision.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed. Followup information was obtained from owners through telephone interviews.

Results—9 of the 11 horses were alive at the time of follow-up interviews. None of the horses had regrowth at the surgery site where the primary tumor was removed. There were no confirmed clinical signs of internal metastasis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that excision of dermal melanomatosis in horses may be a reasonable treatment option. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:94–96)

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether excision was an acceptable treatment for dermal melanomatosis in horses.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—11 horses with dermal melanomatosis involving the perineal, perianal, or perirectal region or ventral surface of the tail in which treatment consisted of tumor excision.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed. Followup information was obtained from owners through telephone interviews.

Results—9 of the 11 horses were alive at the time of follow-up interviews. None of the horses had regrowth at the surgery site where the primary tumor was removed. There were no confirmed clinical signs of internal metastasis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that excision of dermal melanomatosis in horses may be a reasonable treatment option. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:94–96)