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Liposarcomas in dogs: 56 cases (1989–2000)

Jennifer L. Baez VMD, DACVIM1, Mattie J. Hendrick VMD, DACVP2, Frances S. Shofer PhD3, Carrie Goldkamp VMD4, and Karin U. Sorenmo CMV, DACVIM5
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  • 1 Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010.
  • | 2 Department of Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010.
  • | 4 Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010.
  • | 5 Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the biological behavior of liposarcomas in dogs and identify clinical signs, the effect of treatment on survival time, and potential prognostic factors.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—56 dogs with histologically confirmed liposarcoma.

Procedure—Information was obtained on signalment, tumor size, location of the tumor, stage of disease, remission duration, overall survival time, cause of death, type of surgery (incisional biopsy, marginal excision, or wide excision), and any additional treatments given.

Results—Surgery consisted of incisional biopsy in 6 dogs, marginal excision in 34, and wide excision in 16. Twenty-five dogs had histologic evidence of tumor cells at the surgical margins and 28 did not (status of the margins was unknown in 3 dogs). Twelve of 43 dogs had local recurrence. Median survival time was 694 days, and the only factor significantly associated with survival time was type of surgery performed. Median survival times were 1,188, 649, and 183 days, respectively, for dogs that underwent wide excision, marginal excision, and incisional biopsy. Factors that were not found to be significantly associated with survival time included tumor size, status of the margins, tumor location, and histologic subtype.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that in dogs, liposarcomas are locally invasive neoplasms that rarely metastasize and occur primarily in appendicular or axial locations and that wide excision is preferred to marginal excision when feasible. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:887–891)

Abstract

Objective—To determine the biological behavior of liposarcomas in dogs and identify clinical signs, the effect of treatment on survival time, and potential prognostic factors.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—56 dogs with histologically confirmed liposarcoma.

Procedure—Information was obtained on signalment, tumor size, location of the tumor, stage of disease, remission duration, overall survival time, cause of death, type of surgery (incisional biopsy, marginal excision, or wide excision), and any additional treatments given.

Results—Surgery consisted of incisional biopsy in 6 dogs, marginal excision in 34, and wide excision in 16. Twenty-five dogs had histologic evidence of tumor cells at the surgical margins and 28 did not (status of the margins was unknown in 3 dogs). Twelve of 43 dogs had local recurrence. Median survival time was 694 days, and the only factor significantly associated with survival time was type of surgery performed. Median survival times were 1,188, 649, and 183 days, respectively, for dogs that underwent wide excision, marginal excision, and incisional biopsy. Factors that were not found to be significantly associated with survival time included tumor size, status of the margins, tumor location, and histologic subtype.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that in dogs, liposarcomas are locally invasive neoplasms that rarely metastasize and occur primarily in appendicular or axial locations and that wide excision is preferred to marginal excision when feasible. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:887–891)