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Comparison of prices paid for feeder calves sold at conventional auctions versus special auctions of vaccinated or conditioned calves in Ontario

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  • 1 Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON Canada N1G 2W1.
  • | 2 Present address is 17 Roscoe Ave, Trenton, ON Canada K8V 2G4.
  • | 3 Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON Canada N1G 2W1.
  • | 4 Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON Canada N1G 2W1.

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether vaccinated or conditioned feeder calves sold through special auctions in Ontario commanded a premium, compared with feeder calves sold at conventional auctions, and whether various physical characteristics of the calves were associated with the sale price.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Animals—14,037 calves sold through conventional and special auctions at the Keady Livestock Market during the fall of 1999 and 2000.

Procedure—Calves were observed as they were sold by lot in the auction ring. Lot characteristics and the price received for each lot were recorded. Multivariate analysis was used to estimate the effect of lot characteristics and sale type on price.

Results—Information was recorded for 2,601 calf lots. Multivariate analysis indicated that various lot characteristics were associated with sale price, with 68% of the variation explained by the model. Overall, lots sold at special auctions received a premium of $0.06/lb (Canadian dollars), compared with lots sold at conventional auctions. However, the premium varied with mean body weight of the lot and year. In addition, frame size, breed, body condition score, uniformity of the lot, weaning status, mean body weight, lot size, sex, year, and sale type were significantly related to sale price.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that producers selling calves at special auctions at this market received a premium, compared with producers selling calves at conventional auctions. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;223:670–676)

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether vaccinated or conditioned feeder calves sold through special auctions in Ontario commanded a premium, compared with feeder calves sold at conventional auctions, and whether various physical characteristics of the calves were associated with the sale price.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Animals—14,037 calves sold through conventional and special auctions at the Keady Livestock Market during the fall of 1999 and 2000.

Procedure—Calves were observed as they were sold by lot in the auction ring. Lot characteristics and the price received for each lot were recorded. Multivariate analysis was used to estimate the effect of lot characteristics and sale type on price.

Results—Information was recorded for 2,601 calf lots. Multivariate analysis indicated that various lot characteristics were associated with sale price, with 68% of the variation explained by the model. Overall, lots sold at special auctions received a premium of $0.06/lb (Canadian dollars), compared with lots sold at conventional auctions. However, the premium varied with mean body weight of the lot and year. In addition, frame size, breed, body condition score, uniformity of the lot, weaning status, mean body weight, lot size, sex, year, and sale type were significantly related to sale price.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that producers selling calves at special auctions at this market received a premium, compared with producers selling calves at conventional auctions. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;223:670–676)