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Traumatic diaphragmatic hernia in cats: 34 cases (1991–2001)

Chad W. Schmiedt DVM1,2, Karen M. Tobias DVM, MS, DACVS3, and M. A. McCrackin Stevenson DVM, PhD, DACVS4,5
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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901-1071.
  • | 2 Present address is the Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706.
  • | 3 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901-1071.
  • | 4 Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7390
  • | 5 Present address is Laboratory of Intracellular Parasites, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, NIH, NIAID, Hamilton, MT 59840.

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether signalment, duration of hernia, clinical signs, contents of hernia, CBC and serum biochemical abnormalities, concurrent injuries, perioperative treatment and administration of analgesics, results of intraoperative anesthetic monitoring data, or level of training of the veterinarian performing the herniorrhaphy was associated with mortality rate after surgical repair of traumatic diaphragmatic hernia in cats.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—34 cats.

Procedure—Review of medical records and a telephone follow-up with owners and referring veterinarians were performed.

Results—Mean age of affected cats was 3.6 years; cats that survived to the time of discharge were significantly younger than cats that died or were euthanatized. Tachypnea was the most common clinical sign at hospital admission; cats that survived to the time of discharge had significantly higher respiratory rates than cats that died or were euthanatized after surgery. Postoperative complications developed in 50% of cats; tachypnea and dyspnea were most common. Mortality rate was not associated with duration of hernia or results of preoperative CBC and serum biochemical analyses, but was significantly associated with concurrent injuries. Mortality rate was not associated with hernia contents, intraoperative use of positive inotropes or corticosteroids, episodes of hypotension or severe hypoxia during anesthesia, or level of training of the veterinarian performing the surgery.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Cats that are older or have low to mildly increased respiratory rates and concurrent injuries are more likely to die after surgical repair of traumatic diaphragmatic hernia. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;222:1237–1240)

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether signalment, duration of hernia, clinical signs, contents of hernia, CBC and serum biochemical abnormalities, concurrent injuries, perioperative treatment and administration of analgesics, results of intraoperative anesthetic monitoring data, or level of training of the veterinarian performing the herniorrhaphy was associated with mortality rate after surgical repair of traumatic diaphragmatic hernia in cats.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—34 cats.

Procedure—Review of medical records and a telephone follow-up with owners and referring veterinarians were performed.

Results—Mean age of affected cats was 3.6 years; cats that survived to the time of discharge were significantly younger than cats that died or were euthanatized. Tachypnea was the most common clinical sign at hospital admission; cats that survived to the time of discharge had significantly higher respiratory rates than cats that died or were euthanatized after surgery. Postoperative complications developed in 50% of cats; tachypnea and dyspnea were most common. Mortality rate was not associated with duration of hernia or results of preoperative CBC and serum biochemical analyses, but was significantly associated with concurrent injuries. Mortality rate was not associated with hernia contents, intraoperative use of positive inotropes or corticosteroids, episodes of hypotension or severe hypoxia during anesthesia, or level of training of the veterinarian performing the surgery.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Cats that are older or have low to mildly increased respiratory rates and concurrent injuries are more likely to die after surgical repair of traumatic diaphragmatic hernia. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;222:1237–1240)