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Isolation of Staphylococcus schleiferi from dogs with pyoderma

Linda A. Frank MS, DVM, DACVD1, Stephen A. Kania PhD2, Keith A. Hnilica DVM, MS, DACVD3, Rebecca P. Wilkes DVM4, and David A. Bemis PhD5
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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-4544.
  • | 2 Department of Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-4544.
  • | 3 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-4544.
  • | 4 Department of Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-4544.
  • | 5 Department of Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-4544.

Abstract

Objective—To determine frequency with which Staphylococcus schleiferi could be isolated from dogs with pyoderma and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of isolates that were obtained.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—54 dogs with a first (n = 14) or recurrent (40) episode of pyoderma.

Procedure—Specimens were obtained and submitted for bacterial culture. Isolates were identified as S schleiferi on the basis of growth and biochemical characteristics. Two isolates were submitted for DNA sequencing to confirm identification. Methicillin susceptibility was determined by means of disk diffusion with oxacillin-impregnated disks.

Results—3 of 14 dogs examined because of a first episode of pyoderma and 12 of 40 dogs examined because of a recurrent episode of pyoderma were receiving antimicrobials at the time of specimen collection. Staphylococcus schleiferi was not isolated from any dog with first-time pyoderma but was isolated from 5 dogs with recurrent pyoderma that were not receiving antimicrobials at the time of specimen collection and 10 dogs with recurrent pyoderma that were receiving antimicrobials. Nine isolates were identified as S schleiferi subsp schleiferi, and 6 were identified as S schleiferi subsp coagulans. All S schleiferi subsp schleiferi isolates were resistant to methicillin, but only 2 S schleiferi subsp coagulans isolates were. Two methicillin-resistant isolates were also resistant to fluoroquinolones, and 1 isolate had intermediate susceptibility to fluoroquinolones.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that S schleiferi subsp schleiferi and S schleiferi subsp coagulans may be isolated from dogs with recurrent pyoderma. Although isolates from dogs with pyoderma were frequently resistant to methicillin, multiple drug resistance was uncommon. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;222:451–454)

Abstract

Objective—To determine frequency with which Staphylococcus schleiferi could be isolated from dogs with pyoderma and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of isolates that were obtained.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—54 dogs with a first (n = 14) or recurrent (40) episode of pyoderma.

Procedure—Specimens were obtained and submitted for bacterial culture. Isolates were identified as S schleiferi on the basis of growth and biochemical characteristics. Two isolates were submitted for DNA sequencing to confirm identification. Methicillin susceptibility was determined by means of disk diffusion with oxacillin-impregnated disks.

Results—3 of 14 dogs examined because of a first episode of pyoderma and 12 of 40 dogs examined because of a recurrent episode of pyoderma were receiving antimicrobials at the time of specimen collection. Staphylococcus schleiferi was not isolated from any dog with first-time pyoderma but was isolated from 5 dogs with recurrent pyoderma that were not receiving antimicrobials at the time of specimen collection and 10 dogs with recurrent pyoderma that were receiving antimicrobials. Nine isolates were identified as S schleiferi subsp schleiferi, and 6 were identified as S schleiferi subsp coagulans. All S schleiferi subsp schleiferi isolates were resistant to methicillin, but only 2 S schleiferi subsp coagulans isolates were. Two methicillin-resistant isolates were also resistant to fluoroquinolones, and 1 isolate had intermediate susceptibility to fluoroquinolones.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that S schleiferi subsp schleiferi and S schleiferi subsp coagulans may be isolated from dogs with recurrent pyoderma. Although isolates from dogs with pyoderma were frequently resistant to methicillin, multiple drug resistance was uncommon. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;222:451–454)