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Effects of preoperative administration of ketoprofen on anesthetic requirements and signs of postoperative pain in dogs undergoing elective ovariohysterectomy

Kip A. Lemke DVM, MS, DACVA1, Caroline L. Runyon DVM, MS2, and Barbara S. Horney DVM, PhD, DACVP3
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  • 1 Department of Companion Animals, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada, C1A 4P3.
  • | 2 Department of Companion Animals, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada, C1A 4P3.
  • | 3 Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada, C1A 4P3.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of preoperative administration of ketoprofen on anesthetic requirements and signs of postoperative pain in dogs undergoing elective ovariohysterectomy.

Design—Randomized, controlled clinical trial.

Animals—22 clinically normal client-owned dogs.

Procedure—60 minutes before induction of anesthesia, 11 dogs were given ketoprofen (2 mg/kg [0.9 mg/lb], IM), and the other 11 were given saline (0.9% NaCl) solution. Dogs were premedicated with glycopyrrolate, acepromazine, and butorphanol and anesthetized with thiopental; anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane. Ovariohysterectomy was performed by an experienced surgeon, and butorphanol was given 15 minutes before completion of the procedure. Objective behavioral scores and numerical pain scores at rest and with movement were recorded every 2 hours for 12 hours after surgery and then every 4 hours for an additional 12 hours.

Results—Preoperative administration of ketoprofen did not reduce the dose of thiopental required to induce anesthesia or the end-tidal concentration of isoflurane required to maintain anesthesia. Activity levels and median objective behavioral scores were significantly higher 4 and 6 hours after surgery in dogs given ketoprofen than in dogs given saline solution. However, mean numerical pain scores in dogs given ketoprofen were not significantly different from scores for dogs given saline solution at any time.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that preoperative administration of ketoprofen does not reduce anesthetic requirements in dogs undergoing elective ovariohysterectomy but may reduce signs of pain after surgery. Results also suggest that the objective behavioral score may be a more sensitive measure of acute postoperative pain than traditional numerical pain scores. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:1268–1275)

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of preoperative administration of ketoprofen on anesthetic requirements and signs of postoperative pain in dogs undergoing elective ovariohysterectomy.

Design—Randomized, controlled clinical trial.

Animals—22 clinically normal client-owned dogs.

Procedure—60 minutes before induction of anesthesia, 11 dogs were given ketoprofen (2 mg/kg [0.9 mg/lb], IM), and the other 11 were given saline (0.9% NaCl) solution. Dogs were premedicated with glycopyrrolate, acepromazine, and butorphanol and anesthetized with thiopental; anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane. Ovariohysterectomy was performed by an experienced surgeon, and butorphanol was given 15 minutes before completion of the procedure. Objective behavioral scores and numerical pain scores at rest and with movement were recorded every 2 hours for 12 hours after surgery and then every 4 hours for an additional 12 hours.

Results—Preoperative administration of ketoprofen did not reduce the dose of thiopental required to induce anesthesia or the end-tidal concentration of isoflurane required to maintain anesthesia. Activity levels and median objective behavioral scores were significantly higher 4 and 6 hours after surgery in dogs given ketoprofen than in dogs given saline solution. However, mean numerical pain scores in dogs given ketoprofen were not significantly different from scores for dogs given saline solution at any time.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that preoperative administration of ketoprofen does not reduce anesthetic requirements in dogs undergoing elective ovariohysterectomy but may reduce signs of pain after surgery. Results also suggest that the objective behavioral score may be a more sensitive measure of acute postoperative pain than traditional numerical pain scores. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:1268–1275)