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Influence of vestibulovaginal stenosis, pelvic bladder, and recessed vulva on response to treatment for clinical signs of lower urinary tract disease in dogs: 38 cases (1990-1999)

Jason T. CrawfordDepartment of Surgical Sciences. School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin. Madison, WI 59706.

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William M. AdamsDepartment of Surgical Sciences. School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 59706.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine influence of vestibulovaginal stenosis, pelvic" bladder, and recessed vulva on response to treatment for clinical signs of lower urinary tract disease in dogs.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—38 spayed female dogs.

Procedure—Medical records and client follow-up were reviewed for dogs evaluated via excretory urography because of clinical signs of lower urinary tract disease. Clinical signs, results of radiography, and response to surgical or medical treatment were analyzed.

Results—Clinical signs included urinary tract infection (n = 24). urinary incontinence (201, vaginitis (11). pollakiuna or stranguria (10), and perivuivar dermatitis (4). Vaginocystourethrographic findings included vestibulovaginal stenosis (n = 28), pelvic bladder (17). and ureteritis or pyeionephritis (4). Ten dogs had a vestibulovaginal ratio 07 < 0.20 (severe stenosisl, 9 dogs had a ratio of 0.20 to 0.25 (moderate stenosis), 9 dogs had a ratio of 0.26 to 0.35 (mild stenosis). and 10 dogs had a ratio of > 0.35 (anatomically normal). Lower urinary tract infection, incontinence, and pelvic bladder were not associated with response to treatment for recessed vulva Vestibulovaginal stenosts with a ratio < 0.20 was signiflcantly associated negatively wlth response to treatment. Dogs without severe vestibulovaglnai stenosls that rened vulvoplasty for a recessed vulva responded well to treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Vestibulovaginal stenosis is likely an important factor in dogs with vestibulovaginal ratio < 0.20. Vaginectomy or resection and anastomosis should be considered in dogs with severe vestibulovaginal stenosis and signs of lower urinary tract disease.(J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002.221 995–9991

Abstract

Objective—To determine influence of vestibulovaginal stenosis, pelvic" bladder, and recessed vulva on response to treatment for clinical signs of lower urinary tract disease in dogs.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—38 spayed female dogs.

Procedure—Medical records and client follow-up were reviewed for dogs evaluated via excretory urography because of clinical signs of lower urinary tract disease. Clinical signs, results of radiography, and response to surgical or medical treatment were analyzed.

Results—Clinical signs included urinary tract infection (n = 24). urinary incontinence (201, vaginitis (11). pollakiuna or stranguria (10), and perivuivar dermatitis (4). Vaginocystourethrographic findings included vestibulovaginal stenosis (n = 28), pelvic bladder (17). and ureteritis or pyeionephritis (4). Ten dogs had a vestibulovaginal ratio 07 < 0.20 (severe stenosisl, 9 dogs had a ratio of 0.20 to 0.25 (moderate stenosis), 9 dogs had a ratio of 0.26 to 0.35 (mild stenosis). and 10 dogs had a ratio of > 0.35 (anatomically normal). Lower urinary tract infection, incontinence, and pelvic bladder were not associated with response to treatment for recessed vulva Vestibulovaginal stenosts with a ratio < 0.20 was signiflcantly associated negatively wlth response to treatment. Dogs without severe vestibulovaglnai stenosls that rened vulvoplasty for a recessed vulva responded well to treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Vestibulovaginal stenosis is likely an important factor in dogs with vestibulovaginal ratio < 0.20. Vaginectomy or resection and anastomosis should be considered in dogs with severe vestibulovaginal stenosis and signs of lower urinary tract disease.(J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002.221 995–9991