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Open versus closed bilateral anal sacculectomy for treatment of non-neoplastic anal sac disease in dogs: 95 cases (1969–1994)

Lawrence N. HillDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Daniel D. SmeakDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine complications associated with anal sacculectomy in dogs with non-neoplastic anal sac disease and compare complication rates for open versus closed techniques.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—95 dogs.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed for information on signalment, history, physical examination findings, type of anal sac disease, surgical technique (closed, standard open [surgery performed prior to 1980], or modified open [surgery performed after 1980]), and postoperative complications.

Results—In 57 dogs, a closed technique was used, and in 38, an open technique was used. Only 3 dogs developed short-term complications (excessive drainage, scooting and inflammation, and seroma formation), and 14 developed long-term complications (continued licking of the surgery site, fecal incontinence, fistulation, and stricture formation). Development of postoperative complications was significantly associated with surgical technique. Dogs that underwent standard open sacculectomy prior to 1980 were 13.67 times as likely to have a long-term complication as were dogs that underwent closed sacculectomy. Weight of the dog, type of anal sac disease, age at the time of surgery, and whether the wound was closed surgically were not significantly associated with whether dogs developed postoperative complications.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that anal sacculectomy is a safe and effective treatment for non-neoplastic anal sac disease in dogs and is associated with a low rate of complications. The standard open technique was associated with the greatest number of complications, whereas complication rates for the closed and modified open techniques were similar to each other. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:662–665)

Abstract

Objective—To determine complications associated with anal sacculectomy in dogs with non-neoplastic anal sac disease and compare complication rates for open versus closed techniques.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—95 dogs.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed for information on signalment, history, physical examination findings, type of anal sac disease, surgical technique (closed, standard open [surgery performed prior to 1980], or modified open [surgery performed after 1980]), and postoperative complications.

Results—In 57 dogs, a closed technique was used, and in 38, an open technique was used. Only 3 dogs developed short-term complications (excessive drainage, scooting and inflammation, and seroma formation), and 14 developed long-term complications (continued licking of the surgery site, fecal incontinence, fistulation, and stricture formation). Development of postoperative complications was significantly associated with surgical technique. Dogs that underwent standard open sacculectomy prior to 1980 were 13.67 times as likely to have a long-term complication as were dogs that underwent closed sacculectomy. Weight of the dog, type of anal sac disease, age at the time of surgery, and whether the wound was closed surgically were not significantly associated with whether dogs developed postoperative complications.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that anal sacculectomy is a safe and effective treatment for non-neoplastic anal sac disease in dogs and is associated with a low rate of complications. The standard open technique was associated with the greatest number of complications, whereas complication rates for the closed and modified open techniques were similar to each other. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:662–665)