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Evaluation of an oscillometric blood pressure monitor for use in anesthetized cats

Karen M. PedersenDepartment of Clinical Studies, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.

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Michael A. ButlerDepartment of Clinical Studies, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.

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Annette K. ErsbøllDepartment of Animal Science and Animal Health, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.

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Henrik D. PedersenDepartment of Anatomy and Physiology, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine accuracy of an oscillometric blood pressure monitor used over a wide range of pressures in anesthetized cats.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—6 healthy cats.

Procedure—4 female cats and 2 male cats that weighed 2.7 to 4.5 kg (5.9 to 9.9 lb) and were 2 to 8 years old were anesthetized. Blood pressure was measured directly with an arterial catheter placed in the right femoral artery and indirectly from the left antebrachium by use of an oscillometric monitor. A series of diastolic arterial pressure (DAP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and systolic arterial pressure (SAP) measurements were obtained during hypotension, normotension, and hypertension. Values obtained indirectly and directly were compared.

Results—The oscillometric monitor was accurate for DAP and MAP throughout the entire pressure range and met the standards of the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (mean ± SD difference from values obtained directly, ≤ 5 ± 8 mm Hg). The SAP was increasingly underestimated with increasing overall pressure; mean differences from direct measurements were –5.2, –12.1, and –17.7 mm Hg during hypo-, normo-, and hypertension, respectively. Standard deviations for SAP were all ≤ 8 mm Hg. The monitor gave readings during all attempts. The direct blood pressure recording system appeared to perform well with neither under- nor overdamping.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Except for a minor underestimation of SAP during normo- and hypertension, the oscillometric monitor yielded reliable and easily obtainable blood pressure measurements in anesthetized cats. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:646–650)

Abstract

Objective—To determine accuracy of an oscillometric blood pressure monitor used over a wide range of pressures in anesthetized cats.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—6 healthy cats.

Procedure—4 female cats and 2 male cats that weighed 2.7 to 4.5 kg (5.9 to 9.9 lb) and were 2 to 8 years old were anesthetized. Blood pressure was measured directly with an arterial catheter placed in the right femoral artery and indirectly from the left antebrachium by use of an oscillometric monitor. A series of diastolic arterial pressure (DAP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and systolic arterial pressure (SAP) measurements were obtained during hypotension, normotension, and hypertension. Values obtained indirectly and directly were compared.

Results—The oscillometric monitor was accurate for DAP and MAP throughout the entire pressure range and met the standards of the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (mean ± SD difference from values obtained directly, ≤ 5 ± 8 mm Hg). The SAP was increasingly underestimated with increasing overall pressure; mean differences from direct measurements were –5.2, –12.1, and –17.7 mm Hg during hypo-, normo-, and hypertension, respectively. Standard deviations for SAP were all ≤ 8 mm Hg. The monitor gave readings during all attempts. The direct blood pressure recording system appeared to perform well with neither under- nor overdamping.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Except for a minor underestimation of SAP during normo- and hypertension, the oscillometric monitor yielded reliable and easily obtainable blood pressure measurements in anesthetized cats. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:646–650)