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Prospective evaluation of laparoscopic-assisted gastropexy in dogs susceptible to gastric dilatation

Clarence A. Rawlings DVM, PhD, DACVS1, Mary B. Mahaffey DVM, MS, DACVR2, Shannon Bement BS3, and Chanda Canalis BS4
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  • 1 Departments of Small Animal Medicine, Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7390.
  • | 2 Department of Anatomy and Radiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7390.
  • | 3 Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7390.
  • | 4 Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7390.

Abstract

Objective—To determine long-term outcome associated with laparoscopic-assisted gastropexy in prevention of gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) in susceptible dogs and to evaluate use of laparoscopy to correct GDV.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—25 client-owned large-breed dogs.

Procedure—23 dogs susceptible to GDV were referred as candidates for elective gastropexy. These dogs had a history of treatment for gastric dilatation, clinical signs of gastric dilatation, or family members with gastric dilatation. Laparoscopic-assisted gastropexy was performed. One year after surgery, abdominal ultrasonography was performed to evaluate the attachment of the stomach to the abdominal wall. Two dogs with GDV were also treated with laparoscopic-assisted derotation of the stomach and gastropexy.

Results—None of the dogs developed GDV during the year after gastropexy, and all 20 dogs examined ultrasonographically had an intact attachment. Another dog was euthanatized at 11.5 months for unrelated problems. Two dogs with GDV successfully underwent laparoscopic-assisted gastropexy after the stomach was repositioned.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Laparoscopicassisted gastropexy resulted in a persisting attachment between the stomach and abdominal wall, an absence of GDV development, and few complications. Dogs with a high probability for development of GDV should be considered candidates for minimally invasive gastropexy. Carefully selected dogs with GDV can be treated laparoscopically. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:1576–1581)

Abstract

Objective—To determine long-term outcome associated with laparoscopic-assisted gastropexy in prevention of gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) in susceptible dogs and to evaluate use of laparoscopy to correct GDV.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—25 client-owned large-breed dogs.

Procedure—23 dogs susceptible to GDV were referred as candidates for elective gastropexy. These dogs had a history of treatment for gastric dilatation, clinical signs of gastric dilatation, or family members with gastric dilatation. Laparoscopic-assisted gastropexy was performed. One year after surgery, abdominal ultrasonography was performed to evaluate the attachment of the stomach to the abdominal wall. Two dogs with GDV were also treated with laparoscopic-assisted derotation of the stomach and gastropexy.

Results—None of the dogs developed GDV during the year after gastropexy, and all 20 dogs examined ultrasonographically had an intact attachment. Another dog was euthanatized at 11.5 months for unrelated problems. Two dogs with GDV successfully underwent laparoscopic-assisted gastropexy after the stomach was repositioned.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Laparoscopicassisted gastropexy resulted in a persisting attachment between the stomach and abdominal wall, an absence of GDV development, and few complications. Dogs with a high probability for development of GDV should be considered candidates for minimally invasive gastropexy. Carefully selected dogs with GDV can be treated laparoscopically. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:1576–1581)