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Use of a carbon dioxide laser for surgical management of cutaneous masses in horses: 32 cases (1993–2000)

Charles T. McCauleyDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1248.
Present address is Las Colinas Veterinary Clinic, 6112 N O'Connor Blvd, Irving, TX 75039.

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 DVM, DABVP
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Jan F. HawkinsDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1248.

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Stephen B. AdamsDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1248.

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John F. FesslerDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1248.

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 DVM, MS, DACVS

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome of horses in which cutaneous masses were removed with a carbon dioxide laser.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—32 horses.

Procedure—Medical records of horses with 1 or more cutaneous masses treated with a carbon dioxide laser were examined. Follow-up information was obtained through telephone interviews with owners and referring veterinarians.

Results—Cutaneous masses were classified as sarcoids (15 horses), neoplastic masses other than sarcoids (squamous cell carcinoma [9]; fibroma [1]; and melanoma [1]), and nonneoplastic masses (6). Minimum follow-up time was 6 months. Five sarcoids and 2 squamous cell carcinomas recurred. Seven (21%) horses had complications associated with dehiscence of wounds that had been closed primarily or failure of wound healing because of recurrence of the mass. Twenty-six (81%) owners were satisfied with the cosmetic appearance following surgery.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that a carbon dioxide laser may be effective for treatment of cutaneous masses in horses. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:1192–1197)

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome of horses in which cutaneous masses were removed with a carbon dioxide laser.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—32 horses.

Procedure—Medical records of horses with 1 or more cutaneous masses treated with a carbon dioxide laser were examined. Follow-up information was obtained through telephone interviews with owners and referring veterinarians.

Results—Cutaneous masses were classified as sarcoids (15 horses), neoplastic masses other than sarcoids (squamous cell carcinoma [9]; fibroma [1]; and melanoma [1]), and nonneoplastic masses (6). Minimum follow-up time was 6 months. Five sarcoids and 2 squamous cell carcinomas recurred. Seven (21%) horses had complications associated with dehiscence of wounds that had been closed primarily or failure of wound healing because of recurrence of the mass. Twenty-six (81%) owners were satisfied with the cosmetic appearance following surgery.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that a carbon dioxide laser may be effective for treatment of cutaneous masses in horses. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:1192–1197)