Advertisement

Effects of testicular biopsy in clinically normal bulls

Allen M. Heath DVM, MS, DACT1, Robert L. Carson DVM, MS, DACT2, Ram C. Purohit BVSc, PhD, DACT3, Eva M. Sartin DVM, PhD, DACVP, DACVPM4, James G.W. Wenzel DVM, PhD, DACT5, and Dwight F. Wolfe DVM, MS, DACT6
View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849.
  • | 4 Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849.
  • | 5 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849.
  • | 6 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849.

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether testicular needle biopsy is detrimental to testicular function in clinically normal bulls.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—6 mixed-breed mature bulls.

Procedure—A randomly selected testicle from each bull was biopsied with a 14-gauge needle biopsy instrument. Bulls were then evaluated over a 90-day period for changes in scrotal temperature and thermal patterns, ultrasonographic appearance, and quality of spermatozoa. At the end of the 90-day study, bulls were castrated, and testicles were examined grossly and histologically.

Results—Changes were detected in scrotal temperatures and thermal patterns and in the breeding soundness examination results during the first 2 weeks of the study. However, there were no long-term changes in semen quality over the course of the experiment. Hyperechoic areas were detected on ultrasonographic examination and corresponded to the areas of penetration by the biopsy instrument. Microscopic lesions that were indicative of testicular dysfunction were not found.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicate that testicular biopsy is a safe procedure in bulls. Testicular biopsy could possibly be used to further examine bulls that have less than satisfactory results for breeding soundness examinations. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:507–512)

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether testicular needle biopsy is detrimental to testicular function in clinically normal bulls.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—6 mixed-breed mature bulls.

Procedure—A randomly selected testicle from each bull was biopsied with a 14-gauge needle biopsy instrument. Bulls were then evaluated over a 90-day period for changes in scrotal temperature and thermal patterns, ultrasonographic appearance, and quality of spermatozoa. At the end of the 90-day study, bulls were castrated, and testicles were examined grossly and histologically.

Results—Changes were detected in scrotal temperatures and thermal patterns and in the breeding soundness examination results during the first 2 weeks of the study. However, there were no long-term changes in semen quality over the course of the experiment. Hyperechoic areas were detected on ultrasonographic examination and corresponded to the areas of penetration by the biopsy instrument. Microscopic lesions that were indicative of testicular dysfunction were not found.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicate that testicular biopsy is a safe procedure in bulls. Testicular biopsy could possibly be used to further examine bulls that have less than satisfactory results for breeding soundness examinations. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:507–512)