Outcome of ameroid constrictor occlusion of single congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunts in cats: 12 cases (1993–2000)

Marc Havig Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901-1071.
Present address is Dallas Veterinary Surgical Center, 4444 Trinity Mills, Suite 203, Dallas, TX 75287.

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Karen M. Tobias Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901-1071.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine postoperative (≤ 6 days), short-term (≤ 90 days), and long-term (≥ 6 months) outcomes of cats undergoing ameroid constrictor occlusion of single congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunts (PSS) and identify factors associated with outcome.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—12 cats.

Procedure—Cats with single congenital PSS that underwent surgical placement of ameroid constrictors were identified. Follow-up information was obtained through telephone interviews and facsimile correspondence with referring veterinarians and owners.

Results—All cats survived the surgery and were discharged from the hospital. One cat had seizures during the postoperative period. Five cats were clinically normal during follow-up evaluations within 90 days after the surgery. Long-term follow-up information was available for 9 cats. Three were clinically normal, 4 had been euthanatized because of progressive neurologic disease, and 2 had neurologic abnormalities that could not be controlled with medication. Four of 7 cats with continued or recurrent neurologic abnormalities 1 or more months after surgery had normal scintigraphic or hepatic function test results 2 to 6 months after surgery.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that the long-term outcome of ameroid constrictor occlusion of PSS in cats is poor. Owners of older cats and cats with preexisting neurologic signs should be made aware of the potential for a poor outcome when considering surgical correction of this disease. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:337–341)

Abstract

Objective—To determine postoperative (≤ 6 days), short-term (≤ 90 days), and long-term (≥ 6 months) outcomes of cats undergoing ameroid constrictor occlusion of single congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunts (PSS) and identify factors associated with outcome.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—12 cats.

Procedure—Cats with single congenital PSS that underwent surgical placement of ameroid constrictors were identified. Follow-up information was obtained through telephone interviews and facsimile correspondence with referring veterinarians and owners.

Results—All cats survived the surgery and were discharged from the hospital. One cat had seizures during the postoperative period. Five cats were clinically normal during follow-up evaluations within 90 days after the surgery. Long-term follow-up information was available for 9 cats. Three were clinically normal, 4 had been euthanatized because of progressive neurologic disease, and 2 had neurologic abnormalities that could not be controlled with medication. Four of 7 cats with continued or recurrent neurologic abnormalities 1 or more months after surgery had normal scintigraphic or hepatic function test results 2 to 6 months after surgery.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that the long-term outcome of ameroid constrictor occlusion of PSS in cats is poor. Owners of older cats and cats with preexisting neurologic signs should be made aware of the potential for a poor outcome when considering surgical correction of this disease. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:337–341)

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