Advertisement

Effect of an orally administered antacid agent containing aluminum hydroxide and magnesium hydroxide on abomasal luminal pH in clinically normal milk-fed calves

Ahmed F. AhmedFaculty of Veterinary Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt.

Search for other papers by Ahmed F. Ahmed in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BVSc, PhD
,
Peter D. ConstableDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.

Search for other papers by Peter D. Constable in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BVSc, PhD, DACVIM
, and
Nabil A. MiskFaculty of Veterinary Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt.

Search for other papers by Nabil A. Misk in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BVSc, PhD

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of a commercially available orally administered antacid agent containing aluminum hydroxide and magnesium hydroxide on abomasal luminal pH in clinically normal milkfed calves.

Design—Randomized trial.

Animals—5 male dairy calves.

Procedure—Throughout the study, calves were fed milk replacer at 7:30 AM and 7:30 PM. Cannulae for pH electrodes were placed in the abomasal body and pyloric antrum. Treatments consisted of oral administration of a high (50 ml) or low (25 ml) dose of the antacid agent and oral administration of milk replacer alone (control). Antacid was given at 7:30 AM, 3:30 PM, and 11:30 PM, and luminal pH was monitored continuously for 24 hours, beginning 15 minutes before administration of the first dose of antacid.

Results—Administration of the first dose of antacid at the time of the morning feeding resulted in an increase in mean abomasal body luminal pH of < 1 pH unit, whereas administration of the second and third doses of the antacid caused transient (< 3 hours) increases in mean luminal pH of approximately 1.5 (low dose) and 2.5 (high dose) pH units.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that clinically normal milk-fed calves given a commercially available antacid agent, PO, will have a transient increase in abomasal luminal pH. Such agents may, therefore, have a role in the treatment of abomasal ulceration in calves; however, the long-term effects of orally administered antacid agents in milkfed calves and the clinical efficacy of such agents in treating abomasal ulceration remain to be determined. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:74–79)

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of a commercially available orally administered antacid agent containing aluminum hydroxide and magnesium hydroxide on abomasal luminal pH in clinically normal milkfed calves.

Design—Randomized trial.

Animals—5 male dairy calves.

Procedure—Throughout the study, calves were fed milk replacer at 7:30 AM and 7:30 PM. Cannulae for pH electrodes were placed in the abomasal body and pyloric antrum. Treatments consisted of oral administration of a high (50 ml) or low (25 ml) dose of the antacid agent and oral administration of milk replacer alone (control). Antacid was given at 7:30 AM, 3:30 PM, and 11:30 PM, and luminal pH was monitored continuously for 24 hours, beginning 15 minutes before administration of the first dose of antacid.

Results—Administration of the first dose of antacid at the time of the morning feeding resulted in an increase in mean abomasal body luminal pH of < 1 pH unit, whereas administration of the second and third doses of the antacid caused transient (< 3 hours) increases in mean luminal pH of approximately 1.5 (low dose) and 2.5 (high dose) pH units.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that clinically normal milk-fed calves given a commercially available antacid agent, PO, will have a transient increase in abomasal luminal pH. Such agents may, therefore, have a role in the treatment of abomasal ulceration in calves; however, the long-term effects of orally administered antacid agents in milkfed calves and the clinical efficacy of such agents in treating abomasal ulceration remain to be determined. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:74–79)