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Association between cancer chemotherapy and canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus, and rabies virus antibody titers in tumor-bearing dogs

Carolyn J. HenryDepartments of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

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Dudley L. McCawDepartments of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

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Kenny V. BrockDepartment of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849.

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Aaron M. StokerDepartments of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

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Jeff W. TylerDepartments of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

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Deborah J. TateDepartments of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

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Mary Lynn HigginbothamDepartments of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine the association between cancer chemotherapy and serum canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus (CPV), and rabies virus antibody titers in tumor-bearing dogs.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—21 client-owned dogs with various malignancies and 16 client-owned dogs with lymphoma.

Procedure—In study A, serum antibody titers were measured by use of hemagglutination inhibition (CPV titers) or serum neutralization (CDV titers) before and at least 1 month after initiation of chemotherapy. Baseline values were compared with values obtained from a control population of 122 healthy dogs seen for routine revaccination. Titers were considered protective at ≥ 1:96 for CDV and ≥ 1:80 for CPV.

In study B, serum IgG titers were measured by use of immunofluorescent assay (CDV and CPV titers) and rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT, rabies titers) at baseline and again at weeks 5, 8, and 24 of a standard chemotherapy protocol for treatment of lymphoma. An IgG titer of ≥ 1:50 was considered protective for CPV and CDV. An RFFIT titer of ≥ 0.5 U/ml was considered protective for rabies virus.

Results—Significant changes were not detected in CDV, CPV, and rabies virus titers following chemotherapy in tumor-bearing dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that established immunity to CDV, CPV, and rabies virus from previous vaccination is not significantly compromised by standard chemotherapy used to treat tumor-bearing dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1238–1241)

Abstract

Objective—To determine the association between cancer chemotherapy and serum canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus (CPV), and rabies virus antibody titers in tumor-bearing dogs.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—21 client-owned dogs with various malignancies and 16 client-owned dogs with lymphoma.

Procedure—In study A, serum antibody titers were measured by use of hemagglutination inhibition (CPV titers) or serum neutralization (CDV titers) before and at least 1 month after initiation of chemotherapy. Baseline values were compared with values obtained from a control population of 122 healthy dogs seen for routine revaccination. Titers were considered protective at ≥ 1:96 for CDV and ≥ 1:80 for CPV.

In study B, serum IgG titers were measured by use of immunofluorescent assay (CDV and CPV titers) and rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT, rabies titers) at baseline and again at weeks 5, 8, and 24 of a standard chemotherapy protocol for treatment of lymphoma. An IgG titer of ≥ 1:50 was considered protective for CPV and CDV. An RFFIT titer of ≥ 0.5 U/ml was considered protective for rabies virus.

Results—Significant changes were not detected in CDV, CPV, and rabies virus titers following chemotherapy in tumor-bearing dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that established immunity to CDV, CPV, and rabies virus from previous vaccination is not significantly compromised by standard chemotherapy used to treat tumor-bearing dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1238–1241)